Next Article in Journal
The Effects of Cultivating Tobacco and Supplying Nitrogenous Fertilizers on Micronutrients Extractability in Loamy Sand and Sandy Soils
Next Article in Special Issue
Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Enrichment on Landrace and Released Ethiopian Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Cultivars
Previous Article in Journal
Jute Responses and Tolerance to Abiotic Stress: Mechanisms and Approaches
Previous Article in Special Issue
Elevated Temperature Induced Adaptive Responses of Two Lupine Species at Early Seedling Phase
 
 
Article

Screening for Higher Grain Yield and Biomass among Sixty Bread Wheat Genotypes Grown under Elevated CO2 and High-Temperature Conditions

Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of Salamanca (IRNASA), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), 37008 Salamanca, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: James Bunce
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1596; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081596
Received: 16 July 2021 / Revised: 29 July 2021 / Accepted: 30 July 2021 / Published: 3 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crop Adaptation to Elevated CO2 and Temperature)
Global warming will inevitably affect crop development and productivity, increasing uncertainty regarding food production. The exploitation of genotypic variability can be a promising approach for selecting improved crop varieties that can counteract the adverse effects of future climate change. We investigated the natural variation in yield performance under combined elevated CO2 and high-temperature conditions in a set of 60 bread wheat genotypes (59 of the 8TH HTWSN CIMMYT collection and Gazul). Plant height, biomass production, yield components and phenological traits were assessed. Large variations in the selected traits were observed across genotypes. The CIMMYT genotypes showed higher biomass and grain yield when compared to Gazul, indicating that the former performed better than the latter under the studied environmental conditions. Principal component and hierarchical clustering analyses revealed that the 60 wheat genotypes employed different strategies to achieve final grain yield, highlighting that the genotypes that can preferentially increase grain and ear numbers per plant will display better yield responses under combined elevated levels of CO2 and temperature. This study demonstrates the success of the breeding programs under warmer temperatures and the plants’ capacity to respond to the concurrence of certain environmental factors, opening new opportunities for the selection of widely adapted climate-resilient wheat genotypes. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; elevated CO2; high temperature; grain yield; biomass; bread wheat; genotypes climate change; elevated CO2; high temperature; grain yield; biomass; bread wheat; genotypes
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Marcos-Barbero, E.L.; Pérez, P.; Martínez-Carrasco, R.; Arellano, J.B.; Morcuende, R. Screening for Higher Grain Yield and Biomass among Sixty Bread Wheat Genotypes Grown under Elevated CO2 and High-Temperature Conditions. Plants 2021, 10, 1596. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081596

AMA Style

Marcos-Barbero EL, Pérez P, Martínez-Carrasco R, Arellano JB, Morcuende R. Screening for Higher Grain Yield and Biomass among Sixty Bread Wheat Genotypes Grown under Elevated CO2 and High-Temperature Conditions. Plants. 2021; 10(8):1596. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081596

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marcos-Barbero, Emilio L., Pilar Pérez, Rafael Martínez-Carrasco, Juan B. Arellano, and Rosa Morcuende. 2021. "Screening for Higher Grain Yield and Biomass among Sixty Bread Wheat Genotypes Grown under Elevated CO2 and High-Temperature Conditions" Plants 10, no. 8: 1596. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081596

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop