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Scientia Pharmaceutica is published by MDPI from Volume 84 Issue 3 (2016). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Austrian Pharmaceutical Society (Österreichische Pharmazeutische Gesellschaft, ÖPhG).
Article

Swertia Chirata Buch.-Ham. ex Wall. (Gentianaceae), an Endanaered Himalavan Medicinal Plant: Comparative Study of the Secondary Compound Patterns in Market Drua. In Vitro-Cultivated, and Micropropaaated Field Qrown Samples

1
Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, A-1090, Vienna, Austria
2
Laboratoire de Pharmacognosie et Phytochimie, École de Phanacie Genève-Lausanne, Université de Genevè, Quai Ernest Ansermet 30, 121 1 Genève 4, Genève, Switzerlan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sci. Pharm. 2005, 73(3), 127-137; https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-05-11
Received: 11 March 2005 / Accepted: 3 July 2005 / Published: 30 September 2005
Samples of the Himalayan medicinal plant Swertia chirata obtained from a local market in Nepal, from a micropropagated field cultivated clone, and from two in vitro-clones were compared by means of HPLC. The substance patterns of methanolic and dichloromethane extracts of the in vivo grown materials showed good conformity while in the samples from tissue culture major compounds were missing. Our findings confirm that the secondary metabolism of in vitro-cultivated plants normally differs from that of plants in their natural environment. Furthermore, the compound pattern of plants produced through micropropagation and subsequently cultivated in the field is comparable to that of plants collected from the wild. As an alternative to the uncontrolled depletion of the natural resources a sustainable use of Swertia chirata could hence be achieved by controlled field culture of micropropagated plants.
Keywords: Swertia chirata; Gentianaceae; threatened plants; micropropagation; field culture; compound pattern Swertia chirata; Gentianaceae; threatened plants; micropropagation; field culture; compound pattern
MDPI and ACS Style

Wawrosch, C.; Hugh-Bloch, A.; Hostettmann, K.; Kopp, B. Swertia Chirata Buch.-Ham. ex Wall. (Gentianaceae), an Endanaered Himalavan Medicinal Plant: Comparative Study of the Secondary Compound Patterns in Market Drua. In Vitro-Cultivated, and Micropropaaated Field Qrown Samples. Sci. Pharm. 2005, 73, 127-137. https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-05-11

AMA Style

Wawrosch C, Hugh-Bloch A, Hostettmann K, Kopp B. Swertia Chirata Buch.-Ham. ex Wall. (Gentianaceae), an Endanaered Himalavan Medicinal Plant: Comparative Study of the Secondary Compound Patterns in Market Drua. In Vitro-Cultivated, and Micropropaaated Field Qrown Samples. Scientia Pharmaceutica. 2005; 73(3):127-137. https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-05-11

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wawrosch, Christoph, Andreas Hugh-Bloch, Kurt Hostettmann, and Brigitte Kopp. 2005. "Swertia Chirata Buch.-Ham. ex Wall. (Gentianaceae), an Endanaered Himalavan Medicinal Plant: Comparative Study of the Secondary Compound Patterns in Market Drua. In Vitro-Cultivated, and Micropropaaated Field Qrown Samples" Scientia Pharmaceutica 73, no. 3: 127-137. https://doi.org/10.3797/scipharm.aut-05-11

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