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J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2017, 3(2), 8; https://doi.org/10.1186/s40852-017-0059-y (registering DOI)

Emerging clean transportation technologies and distribution of reduced greenhouse gas emissions in Southern California

1
International Logistics Research Department, Port & Logistics Research Division, Korea Maritime Institute (KMI), 26, Haeyang-ro 301 beon-gil Yeongdo-gu, Busan 49111, South Korea
2
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, 228 Hayes Hall, Buffalo, NY 14214-3087, USA
3
Department of Urban Planning and Real Estate, Chung-Ang University, 84 Heukseok-ro, Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 06974, South Korea
4
Department of Research and Forecasting Research and Analysis, Southern California Association of Governments, 818 West 7th Street, 12th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90017, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 January 2017 / Accepted: 22 April 2017 / Published: 15 May 2017
PDF [1328 KB, uploaded 8 February 2018]

Abstract

Technological innovation in transportation and the related industrial and entrepreneurial ecosystems can reduce urban environmental risks, maintaining urban environments. This study measures inter-county spillovers of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions impact associated with economic activity changes in the Southern California region when emerging clean transportation technologies are introduced to the region. Using a pseudo ‘top-down’ method, we successfully distributed the state level GHG emissions data to the county level because the GHG emissions inventory is not supported below the state level by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Using the Environmental Southern California’s Inter-county Social Accounting Matrix (ESCI-SAM) model and a bridge connecting two digit NAICS sectors to the GHG emissions inventory sectors, the spillover effects were measured by replacing of existing final demand for seven counties in the Southern California region. Furthermore, this study developed an extended method to discover how the effect of seven counties of the region is distributed to the rest of California excluding the seven counties, the rest of the U.S., and the rest of the world, respectively. While this study tried to measure how alternative, new clean technology freight vehicles that meet the goal of the Scoping Plan of California could spill over the region, the model developed in this study can be used for the diverse scenario simulations that involve an introduction of green economy that regulates GHG emissions of a local region.
Keywords: Greenhouse gas emissions, Environmental economic model, Local spillover impacts, Spatial disaggregation Greenhouse gas emissions, Environmental economic model, Local spillover impacts, Spatial disaggregation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Park, C.; Park, J.; Choi, S. Emerging clean transportation technologies and distribution of reduced greenhouse gas emissions in Southern California. J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2017, 3, 8.

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J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. EISSN 2199-8531 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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