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Fibers, Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2015) , Pages 1-89

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Open AccessArticle
Novel Hybrid Flax Reinforced Supersap Composites in Automotive Applications
Fibers 2015, 3(1), 76-89; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3010076 - 19 Mar 2015
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3842
Abstract
Flax fibre bio-epoxy composites have not found many commercial uses in structural applications on account of their lack of cost efficiency and high susceptibility to environmental changes. Non-woven flax mats were subjected to alkali, acetylation, silane and enzymatic treatment, and then combined with [...] Read more.
Flax fibre bio-epoxy composites have not found many commercial uses in structural applications on account of their lack of cost efficiency and high susceptibility to environmental changes. Non-woven flax mats were subjected to alkali, acetylation, silane and enzymatic treatment, and then combined with untreated unidirectional (UD) flax fabrics to make hybrid flax bio-epoxy composites. Mechanical and environmental resistance (aging) tests were performed on the treated flax fibres. The glass transition temperature was detected at about 75 °C with little effect of treatments. Untreated composites were found to have a tensile strength of 180 MPa while no significant improvement was observed for any of the treatments, which are also not environmentally friendly. The amiopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) composites after Xenon aging, retained the tensile strength of 175 MPa and a modulus of 11.5 GPa, while untreated composites showed 35% reduction in elastic modulus. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Agave Americana Leaf Fibers
Fibers 2015, 3(1), 64-75; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3010064 - 05 Feb 2015
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 5166
Abstract
The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural [...] Read more.
The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Use of Fiber-Reinforced Cements in Masonry Construction and Structural Rehabilitation
Fibers 2015, 3(1), 41-63; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3010041 - 04 Feb 2015
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3616
Abstract
The use of fiber reinforcement in traditional concrete mixes has been extensively studied and has been slowly finding its regular use in practice. In contrast, opportunities for the use of fibers in masonry applications and structural rehabilitation projects (masonry and concrete structures) have [...] Read more.
The use of fiber reinforcement in traditional concrete mixes has been extensively studied and has been slowly finding its regular use in practice. In contrast, opportunities for the use of fibers in masonry applications and structural rehabilitation projects (masonry and concrete structures) have not been as deeply investigated, where the base matrix may be a weaker cementitious mixture. This paper will summarize the findings of the author’s research over the past 10 years in these particular applications of fiber reinforced cements (FRC). For masonry, considering both mortar and mortar-unit bond characteristics, a 0.5% volume fraction of micro fibers in type N Portland cement lime mortar appear to be a viable recipe for most masonry joint applications both for clay and concrete units. In general, clay units perform better with high water content fiber reinforced mortar (FRM) while concrete masonry units (CMUs) perform better with drier mixtures, so 130% and 110% flow rates should be targeted, respectively. For earth block masonry applications, fibers’ benefits are observed in improving local damage and water pressure resistance. The FRC retrofit technique proposed for the rehabilitation of reinforced concrete two-way slabs has exceeded expectations in terms of capacity increase for a relatively low cost in comparison to the common but expensive fiber reinforced polymer applications. For all of these applications of fiber-reinforced cements, further research with larger data pools would lead to further optimization of fiber type, size, and amount. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
FT-IR Examination of the Development of Secondary Cell Wall in Cotton Fibers
Fibers 2015, 3(1), 30-40; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3010030 - 29 Jan 2015
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 4139
Abstract
The secondary cell wall development of cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering was examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Spectra of deuterated cotton fibers did not demonstrate significant changes in [...] Read more.
The secondary cell wall development of cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering was examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Spectra of deuterated cotton fibers did not demonstrate significant changes in their O–H stretching band shapes or positions during development. Only a progressive increase in O–H band intensity was observed. Results indicate that the highly crystalline cellulose component produced during secondary cell wall formation maintains the hydrogen bonding network observed for the primary cell wall. Other general changes were observed for the regular ATR spectra. A progressive intensity increase for bands assigned to cellulose Iβ was observed during fiber development, including a marked intensity increase for vibrations at 1002 and 985 cm−1. In contrast, C–O vibrational bands from dominant conformations observed at 1104, 1052, 1028 cm−1 undergo a modest intensity increase during secondary cell wall development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellulose Fibers)
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Open AccessArticle
Improving Fatigue Performance of GFRP Composite Using Carbon Nanotubes
Fibers 2015, 3(1), 13-29; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3010013 - 15 Jan 2015
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4321
Abstract
Glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) have become a preferable material for reinforcing or strengthening reinforced concrete structures due to their corrosion resistance, high strength to weight ratio, and relatively low cost compared with carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). However, the limited fatigue life [...] Read more.
Glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) have become a preferable material for reinforcing or strengthening reinforced concrete structures due to their corrosion resistance, high strength to weight ratio, and relatively low cost compared with carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). However, the limited fatigue life of GFRP hinders their use in infrastructure applications. For instance, the low fatigue life of GFRP caused design codes to impose stringent stress limits on GFRP that rendered their use non-economic under significant cyclic loads in bridges. In this paper, we demonstrate that the fatigue life of GFRP can be significantly improved by an order of magnitude by incorporating Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) during GFRP fabrication. GFRP coupons were fabricated and tested under static tension and cyclic tension with mean fatigue stress equal to 40% of the GFRP tensile strength. Microstructural investigations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used for further investigation of the effect of MWCNTs on the GFRP composite. The experimental results show the 0.5 wt% and the 1.0 wt% MWCNTs were able to improve the fatigue life of GFRP by 1143% and 986%, respectively, compared with neat GFRP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Fibers)
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Fibers in 2014
Fibers 2015, 3(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3010012 - 09 Jan 2015
Viewed by 2640
Abstract
The editors of Fibers would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2014:[...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
Porosity Prediction of Plain Weft Knitted Fabrics
Fibers 2015, 3(1), 1-11; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib3010001 - 30 Dec 2014
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4906
Abstract
Wearing comfort of clothing is dependent on air permeability, moisture absorbency and wicking properties of fabric, which are related to the porosity of fabric. In this work, a plug-in is developed using Python script and incorporated in Abaqus/CAE for the prediction of porosity [...] Read more.
Wearing comfort of clothing is dependent on air permeability, moisture absorbency and wicking properties of fabric, which are related to the porosity of fabric. In this work, a plug-in is developed using Python script and incorporated in Abaqus/CAE for the prediction of porosity of plain weft knitted fabrics. The Plug-in is able to automatically generate 3D solid and multifilament weft knitted fabric models and accurately determine the porosity of fabrics in two steps. In this work, plain weft knitted fabrics made of monofilament, multifilament and spun yarn made of staple fibers were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the developed plug-in. In the case of staple fiber yarn, intra yarn porosity was considered in the calculation of porosity. The first step is to develop a 3D geometrical model of plain weft knitted fabric and the second step is to calculate the porosity of the fabric by using the geometrical parameter of 3D weft knitted fabric model generated in step one. The predicted porosity of plain weft knitted fabric is extracted in the second step and is displayed in the message area. The predicted results obtained from the plug-in have been compared with the experimental results obtained from previously developed models; they agreed well. Full article
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