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J. Funct. Biomater., Volume 7, Issue 1 (March 2016)

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Open AccessArticle
Mineralization at Titanium Surfaces is a Two-Step Process
J. Funct. Biomater. 2016, 7(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb7010007 - 15 Mar 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2626
Abstract
Mapping the initial reaction of implants with blood or cell culture medium is important for the understanding of the healing process in bone. In the present study, the formation of low crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) onto commercially pure titanium (Ti) implants from cell [...] Read more.
Mapping the initial reaction of implants with blood or cell culture medium is important for the understanding of the healing process in bone. In the present study, the formation of low crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) onto commercially pure titanium (Ti) implants from cell culture medium and blood, is described as an early event in bone healing at implants. The Ti-implants were incubated with cell culture medium (DMEM) or whole blood and the surface concentration of Ca, P and HA was analyzed by XPS, EDX and Tof-SIMS. After incubation with DMEM for 16 h and 72 h, EDX and XPS analysis showed stable levels of Ca and P on the Ti-surface. ESEM images showed an even distribution of Ca and P. Further analysis of the XPS results indicated that CHA was formed at the implants. Analysis with ToF-SIMS yielded high m.w. fragments of HA, such as Ca2PO4 at m/z 174.9 and Ca3PO5 at m/z 230.8, as secondary ions at the Ti-surfaces. Analysis of implants incubated in blood for 16 h, with ToF-SIMS, showed initial formation of CHA yielding CaOH as secondary ion. The results indicate that early mineralization at Ti-surfaces is an important step in the healing of implants into bone. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of Gelatin/PCL Electrospun Fiber Mat with Bone Powder and the Study of Its Biocompatibility
J. Funct. Biomater. 2016, 7(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb7010006 - 04 Mar 2016
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3353
Abstract
Fabricating ideal scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is a great challenge to researchers. To better mimic the mineral component and the microstructure of natural bone, several kinds of materials were adopted in our study, namely gelatin, polycaprolactone (PCL), nanohydroxyapatite (nHA), and bone powder. [...] Read more.
Fabricating ideal scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is a great challenge to researchers. To better mimic the mineral component and the microstructure of natural bone, several kinds of materials were adopted in our study, namely gelatin, polycaprolactone (PCL), nanohydroxyapatite (nHA), and bone powder. Three types of scaffolds were fabricated using electrospinning; gelatin/PCL, gelatin/PCL/nHA, and gelatin/PCL/bone powder. Scaffolds were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. Then, Adipose-derived Stem Cells (ADSCs) were seeded on these scaffolds to study cell morphology, cell viability, and proliferation. Through this study, we found that nHA and bone powder can be successfully united in gelatin/PCL fibers. When compared with gelatin/PCL and gelatin/PCL/nHA, the gelatin/PCL/bone powder scaffolds could provide a better environment to increase ADSCs’ growth, adhesion, and proliferation. Thus, we think that gelatin/PCL/bone powder has good biocompatibility, and, when compared with nHA, bone powder may be more effective in bone tissue engineering due to the bioactive factors contained in it. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency
J. Funct. Biomater. 2016, 7(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb7010005 - 01 Mar 2016
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4096
Abstract
The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may [...] Read more.
The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocular Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle
Transcriptome Analysis of Cultured Limbal Epithelial Cells on an Intact Amniotic Membrane following Hypothermic Storage in Optisol-GS
J. Funct. Biomater. 2016, 7(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb7010004 - 18 Feb 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3383
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of cell death pathways using genome-wide transcriptional analysis in human limbal epithelial cell (HLEC) cultures following conventional hypothermic storage in Optisol-GS. Three-week HLEC cultures were stored in Optisol-GS for [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of cell death pathways using genome-wide transcriptional analysis in human limbal epithelial cell (HLEC) cultures following conventional hypothermic storage in Optisol-GS. Three-week HLEC cultures were stored in Optisol-GS for 2, 4, and 7 days at 4 °C. Partek Genomics Suite software v.6.15.0422, (Partec Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA) was used to identify genes that showed significantly different (P < 0.05) levels of expression following hypothermic storage compared to non-stored cell sheets. There were few changes in gene expression after 2 days of storage, but several genes were differently regulated following 4 and 7 days of storage. The histone-coding genes HIST1H3A and HIST4H4 were among the most upregulated genes following 4 and 7 days of hypothermic storage. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that these two genes are involved in a functional network highly associated with cell death, necrosis, and transcription of RNA. HDAC1, encoding histone deacetylase 1, was the most downregulated gene after 7 days of storage. Together with other downregulated genes, it is suggested that HDAC1 is involved in a regulating network significantly associated with cellular function and maintenance, differentiation of cells, and DNA repair. Our data suggest that the upregulated expression of histone-coding genes together with downregulated genes affecting cell differentiation and DNA repair may be responsible for increased cell death following hypothermic storage of cultured HLEC. In summary, our results demonstrated that a higher number of genes changed with increasing storage time. Moreover, in general, larger differences in absolute gene expression values were observed with increasing storage time. Further understanding of these molecular mechanisms is important for optimization of storage technology for limbal epithelial sheets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocular Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Journal of Functional Biomaterials in 2015
J. Funct. Biomater. 2016, 7(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb7010003 - 22 Jan 2016
Viewed by 2427
Abstract
The editors of Journal of Functional Biomaterials would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2015. [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
Osseointegration of Titanium Implants in Onlay of Cerament™, a New Ceramic Bone Substitute
J. Funct. Biomater. 2016, 7(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb7010002 - 07 Jan 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2988
Abstract
The purpose was to investigate whether a new biphasic and injectable ceramic bone substitute Cerament™ that rapidly remodels to bone, may contribute to the retention of titanium implant screws during the healing period, and to analyze the pattern of bone formation around titanium [...] Read more.
The purpose was to investigate whether a new biphasic and injectable ceramic bone substitute Cerament™ that rapidly remodels to bone, may contribute to the retention of titanium implant screws during the healing period, and to analyze the pattern of bone formation around titanium implants.Titanium screws were implanted in rat tibiae and embedded with or without Cerament™ on the cortical surface. Torsional resistance was measured after 1 day, and after 6 and 12 weeks. Implant areas without bone substitute were analyzed histologically for comparison. The torsional resistance increased over time as the screws were osseointegrated. There was no difference in resistance between screws embedded in the bone substitute and control screws. The bone apposition was more pronounced on the proximal side of the screw than on the distal side. Cerament™ is capable of conducting bone growth from a cortical bone surface. The newly formed bone in this application does not significantly add to the osseointegrative strength of the implant screw, as measured by torque resistance, during the first 12 weeks. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes
J. Funct. Biomater. 2016, 7(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb7010001 - 07 Jan 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2881
Abstract
The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and [...] Read more.
The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. Full article
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