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Open AccessArticle

Fighting Rage with Fear: The “Faces of Muhammad” and the Limits of Secular Rationality

College of Humanities & Social Sciences, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9082, USA
Religions 2018, 9(3), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9030089
Received: 25 January 2018 / Revised: 14 March 2018 / Accepted: 15 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti Muslim Racism and the Media)
In recent years, a number of incidents have pitted Islam against secularism and liberal democracy. This essay examines the Danish publication of the Prophet Muhammad cartoons in order to examine the deployment of rationality as a litmus test for political membership. It argues that Western media and political analysis of the protests surrounding the cartoons constructed Muslims as anti-rational and thus unfit for democratic citizenship. Such a deployment of rationality inhibits the possibility of and demands for political pluralism. The essay then looks to two disparate theorists of affective reason, Abdulkarim Soroush and William Connolly, to offer an alternative model of reason that encourages pluralist political engagement. View Full-Text
Keywords: Muhammad cartoons; secularism; liberal rationality; political pluralism Muhammad cartoons; secularism; liberal rationality; political pluralism
MDPI and ACS Style

Deylami, S.S. Fighting Rage with Fear: The “Faces of Muhammad” and the Limits of Secular Rationality. Religions 2018, 9, 89.

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