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Review

Psychopharmacological Treatment, Intraocular Pressure and the Risk of Glaucoma: A Review of Literature

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Neuroscience Department, Discipline of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, ‘Carol Davila’ University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
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Department of Psychiatry, ‘Prof. Dr. Alexandru Obregia’ Clinical Hospital of Psychiatry, 041914 Bucharest, Romania
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Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, ‘Carol Davila’ University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
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Service d’Ophtalmologie, Centre Hospitalier ‘Rene Dubos’, 95300 Pontoise, France
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Department of Stress Research and Prophylaxis, ‘Prof. Dr. Alexandru Obregia’ Clinical Hospital of Psychiatry, 041914 Bucharest, Romania
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Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences, 927180 Bucharest, Romania
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Department of Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, ‘Carol Davila’ University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Emmanuel Andrès
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(13), 2947; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132947
Received: 2 June 2021 / Revised: 25 June 2021 / Accepted: 29 June 2021 / Published: 30 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Going for Gaps in Glaucoma)
Through the years, the available psychopharmacological treatments have expanded with numerous new drugs. Besides weight gain, gastro-intestinal problems or Parkinson-like symptoms, ocular adverse effects of psychiatric drugs have been reported. These adverse effects are not common, but can be dangerous for the patient. This review summarises the current knowledge on the risk of raised intraocular pressure and glaucoma entailed by psychopharmacological treatment. Also, it provides updated data for clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with glaucoma or glaucoma risk factors. For this purpose, we performed an extensive literature search in the PubMed database using specific terms. Selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors are the best evidenced as having no association with glaucoma. Antipsychotics, and especially first generation, seem to have no correlation with an increased intraocular pressure and therefore possibly with a risk of glaucoma, although a special attention should be paid when using ziprasidone. Tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines and topiramate should be avoided in patients diagnosed with glaucoma or at risk. Clinicians should be aware of the possible psychotropic drug induced glaucoma and monitor at risk patients closely in order to prevent this condition. Irrespective of the psychopharmacological regimen taken into consideration, the glaucoma patient should be under the strict supervision of the ophthalmologist. View Full-Text
Keywords: glaucoma; intraocular pressure; antidepressant; antipsychotic; benzodiazepine; topiramate; SSRI; SNRI glaucoma; intraocular pressure; antidepressant; antipsychotic; benzodiazepine; topiramate; SSRI; SNRI
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ciobanu, A.M.; Dionisie, V.; Neagu, C.; Bolog, O.M.; Riga, S.; Popa-Velea, O. Psychopharmacological Treatment, Intraocular Pressure and the Risk of Glaucoma: A Review of Literature. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 2947. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132947

AMA Style

Ciobanu AM, Dionisie V, Neagu C, Bolog OM, Riga S, Popa-Velea O. Psychopharmacological Treatment, Intraocular Pressure and the Risk of Glaucoma: A Review of Literature. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(13):2947. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132947

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ciobanu, Adela M., Vlad Dionisie, Cristina Neagu, Otilia M. Bolog, Sorin Riga, and Ovidiu Popa-Velea. 2021. "Psychopharmacological Treatment, Intraocular Pressure and the Risk of Glaucoma: A Review of Literature" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 13: 2947. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132947

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