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Open AccessArticle

Leg Dominance Effects on Postural Control When Performing Challenging Balance Exercises

1
Department of Sport Science, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck 6020, Austria
2
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Phayao, Phayao 56000, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(3), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10030128
Received: 24 January 2020 / Revised: 20 February 2020 / Accepted: 21 February 2020 / Published: 25 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Collection on Systems Neuroscience)
Leg dominance reflects the preferential use of one leg over another and is typically attributed to asymmetries in the neural circuitry. Detecting leg dominance effects on motor behavior, particularly during balancing exercises, has proven difficult. The current study applied a principal component analysis (PCA) on kinematic data, to assess bilateral asymmetry on the coordinative structure (hypothesis H1) or on the control characteristics of specific movement components (hypothesis H2). Marker-based motion tracking was performed on 26 healthy adults (aged 25.3 ± 4.1 years), who stood unipedally on a multiaxial unstable board, in a randomized order, on their dominant and non-dominant leg. Leg dominance was defined as the kicking leg. PCA was performed to determine patterns of correlated segment movements (“principal movements” PMks). The control of each PMk was characterized by assessing its acceleration (second-time derivative). Results were inconclusive regarding a leg-dominance effect on the coordinative structure of balancing movements (H1 inconclusive); however, different control (p = 0.005) was observed in PM3, representing a diagonal plane movement component (H2 was supported). These findings supported that leg dominance effects should be considered when assessing or training lower-limb neuromuscular control and suggest that specific attention should be given to diagonal plane movements. View Full-Text
Keywords: leg dominance; one-leg stance; motor control; movement strategy; diagonal movement; balance board; sex difference; minimal intervention principle; optimal feedback control theory; principal movement; principal component analysis (PCA) leg dominance; one-leg stance; motor control; movement strategy; diagonal movement; balance board; sex difference; minimal intervention principle; optimal feedback control theory; principal movement; principal component analysis (PCA)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Promsri, A.; Haid, T.; Werner, I.; Federolf, P. Leg Dominance Effects on Postural Control When Performing Challenging Balance Exercises. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 128.

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