Next Issue
Volume 7, March
Previous Issue
Volume 7, November

Table of Contents

Med. Sci., Volume 7, Issue 12 (December 2019) – 6 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Cover Story (view full-size image) Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic inflammatory degenerative disease which occurs globally. [...] Read more.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle
Bayesian Space–Time Analysis of Brain Cancer Incidence in Southern Ontario, Canada: 2010–2013
Med. Sci. 2019, 7(12), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7120110 - 14 Dec 2019
Viewed by 352
Abstract
Canada has one of the highest incidence rates of brain cancer in the world. This study investigates the space–time variation of brain cancer risk across Southern Ontario, Canada. A Bayesian spatio-temporal regression model is used to estimate the relative risk of brain cancer [...] Read more.
Canada has one of the highest incidence rates of brain cancer in the world. This study investigates the space–time variation of brain cancer risk across Southern Ontario, Canada. A Bayesian spatio-temporal regression model is used to estimate the relative risk of brain cancer in the 12 spatial health units of Southern Ontario over a four-year period (2010–2013). This work also explores the association between brain cancer and two potential risk factors: traumatic head injury (THI) and excess body fat (EBF). Across all areal units from 2010–2013, results show that the relative risk of brain cancer ranged from 0.83 (95% credible interval (CI) 0.74–0.91) to 1.26 (95% CI 1.13–1.41). Over the years, the eastern and western health units had persistently higher risk levels compared to those in the central areas. Results suggest that areas with elevated THI rates and EBF levels were also potentially associated with higher brain cancer relative risk. Findings revealed that the mean temporal trend for cancer risk progression in the region smoothly decreased over time. Overall, 50% of the health units displayed area-specific trends which were higher than the region’s average, thus indicating a slower decrease in cancer rates for these areas in comparison to the mean trend. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Ejaculatory and Orgasmic Dysfunction Following Prostate Cancer Therapy: Clinical Management
Med. Sci. 2019, 7(12), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7120109 - 10 Dec 2019
Viewed by 375
Abstract
The majority of sexual health research has focused on erectile dysfunction following prostate cancer treatment. Ejaculatory and orgasmic dysfunction are significant side effects following the treatment of prostate cancer. Orgasmic dysfunction covers a range of issues including premature ejaculation, anorgasmia, dysorgasmia, and climacturia. [...] Read more.
The majority of sexual health research has focused on erectile dysfunction following prostate cancer treatment. Ejaculatory and orgasmic dysfunction are significant side effects following the treatment of prostate cancer. Orgasmic dysfunction covers a range of issues including premature ejaculation, anorgasmia, dysorgasmia, and climacturia. This review provides an overview of prevalence and management options to deal with orgasmic dysfunction. A Medline Pubmed search was used to identify articles relating to these problems. We found that orgasmic dysfunction has a very large impact on patients’ lives following prostate cancer treatment and there are ways for physicians to treat it. Management of patients’ sexual health should be focused not only on erectile dysfunction, but on orgasmic dysfunction as well in order to ensure a healthy sexual life for patients and their partners. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Men's Sexual Health)
Open AccessReview
Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channels in Cancer Therapy
Med. Sci. 2019, 7(12), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7120108 - 30 Nov 2019
Viewed by 332
Abstract
In mammals, the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels family consists of six different families, namely TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), TRPP (polycystin), and TRPA (ankyrin), that are strictly connected with cancer cell proliferation, differentiation, cell death, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion. [...] Read more.
In mammals, the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels family consists of six different families, namely TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), TRPP (polycystin), and TRPA (ankyrin), that are strictly connected with cancer cell proliferation, differentiation, cell death, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion. Changes in TRP channels’ expression and function have been found to regulate cell proliferation and resistance or sensitivity of cancer cells to apoptotic-induced cell death, resulting in cancer-promoting effects or resistance to chemotherapy treatments. This review summarizes the data reported so far on the effect of targeting TRP channels in different types of cancer by using multiple TRP-specific agonists, antagonists alone, or in combination with classic chemotherapeutic agents, microRNA specifically targeting the TRP channels, and so forth, and the in vitro and in vivo feasibility evaluated in experimental models and in cancer patients. Considerable efforts have been made to fight cancer cells, and therapies targeting TRP channels seem to be the most promising strategy. However, more in-depth investigations are required to completely understand the role of TRP channels in cancer in order to design new, more specific, and valuable pharmacological tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeting TRP Channels: from Drug Development to Clinical Trials)
Open AccessReview
Naturally Occurring and Experimentally Induced Rhesus Macaque Models for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Translational Gateways to Clinical Application
Med. Sci. 2019, 7(12), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7120107 - 27 Nov 2019
Viewed by 504
Abstract
Indian rhesus macaque nonhuman primate models for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) implicate both female hyperandrogenism and developmental molecular origins as core components of PCOS etiopathogenesis. Establishing and exploiting macaque models for translational impact into the clinic, however, has required multi-year, integrated basic-clinical science [...] Read more.
Indian rhesus macaque nonhuman primate models for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) implicate both female hyperandrogenism and developmental molecular origins as core components of PCOS etiopathogenesis. Establishing and exploiting macaque models for translational impact into the clinic, however, has required multi-year, integrated basic-clinical science collaborations. Paradigm shifting insight has accrued from such concerted investment, leading to novel mechanistic understanding of PCOS, including hyperandrogenic fetal and peripubertal origins, epigenetic programming, altered neural function, defective oocytes and embryos, adipogenic constraint enhancing progression to insulin resistance, pancreatic decompensation and type 2 diabetes, together with placental compromise, all contributing to transgenerational transmission of traits likely to manifest in adult PCOS phenotypes. Our recent demonstration of PCOS-related traits in naturally hyperandrogenic (High T) female macaques additionally creates opportunities to employ whole genome sequencing to enable exploration of gene variants within human PCOS candidate genes contributing to PCOS-related traits in macaque models. This review will therefore consider Indian macaque model contributions to various aspects of PCOS-related pathophysiology, as well as the benefits of using macaque models with compellingly close homologies to the human genome, phenotype, development and aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polycystic Ovary Syndrome)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Narcolepsy in Children and Adults: A Guide to Improved Recognition, Diagnosis and Management
Med. Sci. 2019, 7(12), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7120106 - 27 Nov 2019
Viewed by 468
Abstract
Narcolepsy is a rare condition that affects children and adults, and commonly has an onset in childhood. Time to appropriate diagnosis frequently is at least a decade. Unrecognized or misdiagnosed symptoms of narcolepsy contribute to increased morbidity, disability and socioeconomic liability in these [...] Read more.
Narcolepsy is a rare condition that affects children and adults, and commonly has an onset in childhood. Time to appropriate diagnosis frequently is at least a decade. Unrecognized or misdiagnosed symptoms of narcolepsy contribute to increased morbidity, disability and socioeconomic liability in these patients. Delays in diagnosis may be related to variability in presentation in childhood, lack of familiarity with symptoms or appropriate diagnostic testing or misdiagnosis with accidental introduction of treatment that may modify or mask narcolepsy features. Improved awareness about the diagnosis and tailored therapies improve clinical and socioeconomic outcomes by reducing time to effective treatment. Application of effective treatment results in long-term benefits by improving clinical outcomes, potentially enabling improved education, increased employment opportunity, and improved work productivity and quality of life. This review provides a comprehensive stepwise approach to improve knowledge and comfort for recognition of symptoms, diagnostic strategies and management considerations of narcolepsy in children and adults. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Role of Jumpstart Nutrition®, a Dietary Supplement, to Ameliorate Calcium-to-Phosphorus Ratio and Parathyroid Hormone of Patients with Osteoarthritis
Med. Sci. 2019, 7(12), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7120105 - 22 Nov 2019
Viewed by 370
Abstract
The aim of this study was to use Jumpstart Nutrition® bone supplementing combination with vitamin-K2 and coenzyme-Q10 characterized by an innovative delivery system that improves bioavailability of calcium-to-phosphorus ratio (CPR) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the management of osteoarthritis (OA). [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to use Jumpstart Nutrition® bone supplementing combination with vitamin-K2 and coenzyme-Q10 characterized by an innovative delivery system that improves bioavailability of calcium-to-phosphorus ratio (CPR) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the management of osteoarthritis (OA). This eight-week registry included 108 patients treated for symptomatic OA confirmed with radiological images. On top of that, 63 patients used Jumpstart Nutrition® supplement, mainly prepared with calcium, phosphorus, coenzyme-Q10, vitamin-K2, vitamin-D2, vitamin-C, folic acid, curcumin and boswellic acids. Rescue medication was also recommended. Patients’ pain and functional capacity through outcome measures—knee-injury osteoarthritis outcome scale (KOOS) and Karnofsky performance scale (KPS), biomarkers such as levels of CPR, PTH and 25-hydroxy-vitamin-D were evaluated for the groups with and without supplement using appropriate kits. After eight weeks, the levels of CPR and PTH were all significantly improved (p < 0.001), fewer subjects had to use rescue medication (p < 0.05) and variation of pain and functional capacity under KOOS and KPS (p < 0.05) of the patients in the supplement group compared to controls. This registry study indicates that Jumpstart Nutrition® can be used safely for effective management of OA patients for the amelioration of CPR, PTH and functional activities confirmed with biomarkers and radiological images correlated with the Kellgren-Lawrance scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Neurosciences)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop