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Review

Killing Traps and Snares in North America: The Need for Stricter Checking Time Periods

1
Alpha Wildlife Research & Management Ltd., 229 Lilac Terrace, Sherwood Park, Alberta, AB T8H 1W3, Canada
2
Retired Problem Wildlife Specialist, Alberta Agriculture, Box 1366, Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, AB T4T 1B1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2019, 9(8), 570; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080570
Received: 18 May 2019 / Revised: 14 August 2019 / Accepted: 16 August 2019 / Published: 17 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Welfare of Wild Vertebrates)
In this review, we make the point that current checking times for killing traps and snares are inadequate or nonexistent in most North American jurisdictions. We use Conibear 120 rotating-jaw traps and killing neck snares as examples of trapping devices that may fail to consistently and humanely kill furbearers. Because these killing devices are not powerful enough for the target species, the trigger systems do not properly position the animals in traps, or trappers are inexperienced and improperly set traps or snares, these killing devices become restraining devices, and animals suffer long and painful deaths. Because trappers use a variety of trigger configurations and trap sets, all killing devices, even those certified by trapper organizations or governments, should be monitored at least once every 24 h on traplines, but preferably every 12 h, because one cannot know a priori whether traps will strike animals in appropriate locations for a quick kill. However, when using trapping devices such as killing neck snares that are legal and allowed by government agencies despite being inhumane, trappers should check them every 12 h. When traplines are situated near urban areas, e.g., within 10 km, checks should be done every 12 h to release pets and non-target animals.
In this review, we make the point that current checking times for killing traps and snares are inadequate or nonexistent in most North American jurisdictions. We use Conibear 120 rotating-jaw traps and killing neck snares as examples of trapping devices that may fail to consistently and humanely kill furbearers. Because these killing devices are not powerful enough for the target species, the trigger systems do not properly position the animals in traps, or trappers are inexperienced and improperly set traps or snares, these killing devices become restraining devices, and animals suffer long and painful deaths. Because trappers use a variety of trigger configurations and trap sets, all killing devices, even those certified by trapper organizations or governments, should be monitored at least once every 24 h on traplines, but preferably every 12 h, because one cannot know a priori whether traps will strike animals in appropriate locations for a quick kill. However, when using trapping devices such as killing neck snares that are legal and allowed by government agencies despite being inhumane, trappers should check them every 12 h. When traplines are situated near urban areas, e.g., within 10 km, checks should be done every 12 h to release pets and non-target animals. View Full-Text
Keywords: AIHTS; killing traps; killing snares; wildlife welfare; trap check times; trapline management; international humane trapping standards AIHTS; killing traps; killing snares; wildlife welfare; trap check times; trapline management; international humane trapping standards
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MDPI and ACS Style

Proulx, G.; Rodtka, D. Killing Traps and Snares in North America: The Need for Stricter Checking Time Periods. Animals 2019, 9, 570. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080570

AMA Style

Proulx G, Rodtka D. Killing Traps and Snares in North America: The Need for Stricter Checking Time Periods. Animals. 2019; 9(8):570. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080570

Chicago/Turabian Style

Proulx, Gilbert, and Dwight Rodtka. 2019. "Killing Traps and Snares in North America: The Need for Stricter Checking Time Periods" Animals 9, no. 8: 570. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080570

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