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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Feed Supplemented with Selenium-Enriched Olive Leaves on Plasma Oxidative Status, Mineral Profile, and Leukocyte DNA Damage in Growing Rabbits

1
Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Food Science, University of Perugia, 06121 Perugia, Italy
2
Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biotechnology, via del Giochetto, University of Perugia, 06126 Perugia, Italy
3
Department for Sustainable Process, Agricultural Faculty, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore of Piacenza, 29122 Piacenza, Italy
4
Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biotechnology, University of Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(2), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10020274
Received: 14 January 2020 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 8 February 2020 / Published: 11 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste and/or By-Products Use in the “Circular Economy” Idea)
Olive trees (Olea europaea L., Oleaceae) are among the most extensively cultivated crops in the Mediterranean countries (98% of the world's olive production) and are used for oil extraction or table olives, whereas the residues from pruning (olive leaves and wood) and extraction process (olive pomace) are considered waste or by-products. Furthermore, many agronomic practices, such as foliar spray administration of selenium used to reduce the water stress damage of olive trees, could further improve the nutritional value of these “wastes”. The use of by-products as part of the rabbit diet can be a very effective example of recovery of healthy molecules while at the same time a way of developing a more sustainable production system. Accordingly, the idea of the present research is to administer the by-product “olive leaves” to growing rabbits to improve their health status and partially solve the problem of waste disposal of olive trees.
This study investigated the effect of a dietary combination of selenium and olive leaves on rabbit health status in order to evaluate the potential use of these combinations as functional ingredients in feed and food. Sixty weaning rabbits were fed with three diets: control feed (C), control feed + 10% normal olive leaves (OL), or olive leaves enriched in Se (2.17 mg Se/kg d.m.; SeOL). The plasma mineral profile, antioxidant status, and leukocyte DNA damage were determined. Inorganic Se was the most abundant form in the OL diet, while the organic one was higher in SeOL than C and OL. A similar trend was found in the plasma. Protein oxidation showed higher values in both supplemented groups; in addition, dietary Se led to a significant improvement (+ 40%) in ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP). A marked reduction in DNA damage (9-fold) was observed in the SeOL group compared to C. The combination of selenium and olive leaves in the diet of growing rabbits increased plasma SeMet and FRAP and reduced leukocyte DNA damage.
Keywords: Olea europaea; selenium; blood; oxidative status; minerals; DNA damage Olea europaea; selenium; blood; oxidative status; minerals; DNA damage
MDPI and ACS Style

Mattioli, S.; Rosignoli, P.; D'Amato, R.; Fontanella, M.C.; Regni, L.; Castellini, C.; Proietti, P.; Elia, A.C.; Fabiani, R.; Beone, G.M.; Businelli, D.; Dal Bosco, A. Effect of Feed Supplemented with Selenium-Enriched Olive Leaves on Plasma Oxidative Status, Mineral Profile, and Leukocyte DNA Damage in Growing Rabbits. Animals 2020, 10, 274.

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