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Analysis of the Possibilities of Using a Driver’s Brain Activity to Pneumatically Actuate a Secondary Foot Brake Pedal

Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Metrology, Faculty of Mechatronics and Mechanical Engineering, Kielce University of Technology, aleja Tysiaclecia Panstwa Polskiego 7, 25-314 Kielce, Poland
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Actuators 2020, 9(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/act9030049
Received: 9 June 2020 / Revised: 23 June 2020 / Accepted: 29 June 2020 / Published: 1 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Variable Stiffness Actuators)
The study deals with the use of the driver’s brain activity for wireless remote control of the pneumatic actuator exerting pressure on the secondary foot brake pedal. The conducted experimental tests confirm that bioelectrical signals (BES) induced by muscle tension within the head can be used for wireless remote control of a pneumatic actuator to exert a pressure force on a foot brake pedal for disabled drivers during car emergency braking. It has been shown that the BES artefacts generated by muscular tension inside the head (e.g., movement of the face and eyelids, clenching of jaws, and pressing the tongue on the palate) are the easiest to control of the pneumatic systems. The proposed car braking assistance system controlled by the driver’s brain activity can improve the driving safety of disabled people, e.g., by reducing the reaction time of pneumatically assisted emergency braking. View Full-Text
Keywords: brain control interface; pneumatic control system; secondary foot brake pedal; emergency braking brain control interface; pneumatic control system; secondary foot brake pedal; emergency braking
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dindorf, R.; Wos, P. Analysis of the Possibilities of Using a Driver’s Brain Activity to Pneumatically Actuate a Secondary Foot Brake Pedal. Actuators 2020, 9, 49.

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