Next Article in Journal
Fiscal Challenges in Multilayered Unions: An Overview and Case Study
Previous Article in Journal
Migrant and Non-Migrant Families in Chengdu, China: Segregated Lives, Segregated Schools
Open AccessArticle

Persistent Confusions about Hypothesis Testing in the Social Sciences

Department of Mathematics, Texas A&M University-Central Texas, 1001 Leadership Place, Killeen, TX 76549, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Martin J. Bull
Soc. Sci. 2015, 4(2), 361-372; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci4020361
Received: 24 December 2014 / Revised: 11 March 2015 / Accepted: 27 April 2015 / Published: 12 May 2015
This paper analyzes common confusions involving basic concepts in statistical hypothesis testing. One-third of the social science statistics textbooks examined in the study contained false statements about significance level and/or p-value. We infer that a large proportion of social scientists are being miseducated about these concepts. We analyze the causes of these persistent misunderstandings, and conclude that the conventional terminology is prone to abuse because it does not clearly represent the conditional nature of probabilities and events involved. We argue that modifications in terminology, as well as the explicit introduction of conditional probability concepts and notation into the statistics curriculum in the social sciences, are necessary to prevent the persistence of these errors. View Full-Text
Keywords: statistics; hypothesis testing; inference; p-value; significance; conditional probability; conditional event statistics; hypothesis testing; inference; p-value; significance; conditional probability; conditional event
MDPI and ACS Style

Thron, C.; Miller, V. Persistent Confusions about Hypothesis Testing in the Social Sciences. Soc. Sci. 2015, 4, 361-372.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop