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Lubricants, Volume 2, Issue 2 (June 2014) – 3 articles , Pages 44-112

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754 KiB  
Review
Reducing Friction and Wear of Tribological Systems through Hybrid Tribofilm Consisting of Coating and Lubricants
by Shuichiro Yazawa, Ichiro Minami and Braham Prakash
Lubricants 2014, 2(2), 90-112; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants2020090 - 23 Jun 2014
Cited by 38 | Viewed by 10622
Abstract
The role of surface protective additives becomes vital when operating conditions become severe and moving components operate in a boundary lubrication regime. After protecting film is slowly removed by rubbing, it can regenerate through the tribochemical reaction of the additives at the contact. [...] Read more.
The role of surface protective additives becomes vital when operating conditions become severe and moving components operate in a boundary lubrication regime. After protecting film is slowly removed by rubbing, it can regenerate through the tribochemical reaction of the additives at the contact. However, there are limitations about the regeneration of the protecting film when additives are totally consumed. On the other hand, there are a lot of hard coatings to protect the steel surface from wear. These can enable the functioning of tribological systems, even in adverse lubrication conditions. However, hard coatings usually make the friction coefficient higher, because of their high interfacial shear strength. Amongst hard coatings, diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used, because of its relatively low friction and superior wear resistance. In practice, conventional lubricants that are essentially formulated for a steel/steel surface are still used for lubricating machine component surfaces provided with protective coatings, such as DLCs, despite the fact that the surface properties of coatings are quite different from those of steel. It is therefore important that the design of additive molecules and their interaction with coatings should be re-considered. The main aim of this paper is to discuss the DLC and the additive combination that enable tribofilm formation and effective lubrication of tribological systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tribology of Carbon-Based Coatings)
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2459 KiB  
Review
Abrasive Resistant Coatings—A Review
by Linmin Wu, Xingye Guo and Jing Zhang
Lubricants 2014, 2(2), 66-89; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants2020066 - 21 May 2014
Cited by 62 | Viewed by 11924
Abstract
Abrasive resistant coatings have been widely used to reduce or eliminate wear, extending the lifetime of products. Abrasive resistant coatings can also be used in certain environments unsuitable for lubrications. Moreover, abrasive resistant coatings have been employed to strengthen mechanical properties, such as [...] Read more.
Abrasive resistant coatings have been widely used to reduce or eliminate wear, extending the lifetime of products. Abrasive resistant coatings can also be used in certain environments unsuitable for lubrications. Moreover, abrasive resistant coatings have been employed to strengthen mechanical properties, such as hardness and toughness. Given recently rapid development in abrasive resistant coatings, this paper provides a review of major types of abrasive coatings, their wearing mechanisms, preparation methods, and properties. Full article
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1457 KiB  
Review
Graphite and Hybrid Nanomaterials as Lubricant Additives
by Zhenyu J. Zhang, Dorin Simionesie and Carl Schaschke
Lubricants 2014, 2(2), 44-65; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants2020044 - 24 Apr 2014
Cited by 102 | Viewed by 15700
Abstract
Lubricant additives, based on inorganic nanoparticles coated with organic outer layer, can reduce wear and increase load-carrying capacity of base oil remarkably, indicating the great potential of hybrid nanoparticles as anti-wear and extreme-pressure additives with excellent levels of performance. The organic part in [...] Read more.
Lubricant additives, based on inorganic nanoparticles coated with organic outer layer, can reduce wear and increase load-carrying capacity of base oil remarkably, indicating the great potential of hybrid nanoparticles as anti-wear and extreme-pressure additives with excellent levels of performance. The organic part in the hybrid materials improves their flexibility and stability, while the inorganic part is responsible for hardness. The relationship between the design parameters of the organic coatings, such as molecular architecture and the lubrication performance, however, remains to be fully elucidated. A survey of current understanding of hybrid nanoparticles as lubricant additives is presented in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Additives for Lubricants)
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