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Red Supergiants, Yellow Hypergiants, and Post-RSG Evolution

1
SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA, USA
2
Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church St. SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 940353, USA
Galaxies 2019, 7(4), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/galaxies7040092
Received: 14 October 2019 / Revised: 25 November 2019 / Accepted: 26 November 2019 / Published: 3 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Luminous Stars in Nearby Galaxies)
How massive stars end their lives remains an open question in the field of star evolution. While the majority of stars above ≳9 M will become red supergiants (RSGs), the terminal state of these massive stars can be heavily influenced by their mass-loss histories. Periods of enhanced circumstellar wind activity can drive stars off the RSG branch of the HR Diagram. This phase, known as post-RSG evolution, may well be tied to high mass-loss events or eruptions as seen in the Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and other massive stars. This article highlights some of the recent observational and modeling studies that seek to characterize this unique class of stars, the post-RSGs and link them to other massive objects on the HR Diagram such as LBVs, Yellow Hypergiants and dusty RSGs. View Full-Text
Keywords: evolved stars; Yellow Hypergiants; Red Supergiants; stellar mass loss evolved stars; Yellow Hypergiants; Red Supergiants; stellar mass loss
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Gordon, M.S.; Humphreys, R.M. Red Supergiants, Yellow Hypergiants, and Post-RSG Evolution. Galaxies 2019, 7, 92.

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