Next Article in Journal
Detection of Embryonic Trisomy 21 in the First Trimester Using Maternal Plasma Cell-Free RNA
Next Article in Special Issue
Nonlinear and Linear Measures in the Differentiation of Postural Control in Patients after Total Hip or Knee Replacement and Healthy Controls
Previous Article in Journal
Circulating Lymphocytes Reflect the Local Immune Response in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sleep Position Detection with a Wireless Audio-Motion Sensor—A Validation Study
 
 
Article

Can We Use the Oculus Quest VR Headset and Controllers to Reliably Assess Balance Stability?

1
School of Psychology, Ulster University, Coleraine BT52 1SL, UK
2
School of Psychology, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, UK
3
School of Maths & Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, UK
4
School of Sport, Ulster University, Belfast BT15 1ED, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Carlo Ricciardi, Francesco Amato and Mario Cesarelli
Diagnostics 2022, 12(6), 1409; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12061409
Received: 17 May 2022 / Revised: 30 May 2022 / Accepted: 31 May 2022 / Published: 7 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Use of Motion Analysis for Diagnostics)
Balance is the foundation upon which all other motor skills are built. Indeed, many neurological diseases and injuries often present clinically with deficits in balance control. With recent advances in virtual reality (VR) hardware bringing low-cost headsets into the mainstream market, the question remains as to whether this technology could be used in a clinical context to assess balance. We compared the head tracking performance of a low-cost VR headset (Oculus Quest) with a gold standard motion tracking system (Qualisys). We then compared the recorded head sway with the center of pressure (COP) measures collected from a force platform in different stances and different visual field manipulations. Firstly, our analysis showed that there was an excellent correspondence between the two different head movement signals (ICCs > 0.99) with minimal differences in terms of accuracy (<5 mm error). Secondly, we found that head sway mapped onto COP measures more strongly when the participant adopted a Tandem stance during balance assessment. Finally, using the power of virtual reality to manipulate the visual input to the brain, we showed how the Oculus Quest can reliably detect changes in postural control as a result of different types of visual field manipulations. Given the high levels of accuracy of the motion tracking of the Oculus Quest headset, along with the strong relationship with the COP and ability to manipulate the visual field, the Oculus Quest makes an exciting alternative to traditional lab-based balance assessments. View Full-Text
Keywords: balance assessment; VR; postural control; low-cost; visual field manipulation balance assessment; VR; postural control; low-cost; visual field manipulation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Craig, C.M.; Stafford, J.; Egorova, A.; McCabe, C.; Matthews, M. Can We Use the Oculus Quest VR Headset and Controllers to Reliably Assess Balance Stability? Diagnostics 2022, 12, 1409. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12061409

AMA Style

Craig CM, Stafford J, Egorova A, McCabe C, Matthews M. Can We Use the Oculus Quest VR Headset and Controllers to Reliably Assess Balance Stability? Diagnostics. 2022; 12(6):1409. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12061409

Chicago/Turabian Style

Craig, Cathy M., James Stafford, Anastasiia Egorova, Carla McCabe, and Mark Matthews. 2022. "Can We Use the Oculus Quest VR Headset and Controllers to Reliably Assess Balance Stability?" Diagnostics 12, no. 6: 1409. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12061409

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop