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Open AccessArticle

North Sea Ecosystem-Scale Model-Based Quantification of Net Primary Productivity Changes by the Benthic Filter Feeder Mytilus edulis

Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany
Water 2018, 10(11), 1527; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111527
Received: 6 July 2018 / Revised: 20 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 October 2018 / Published: 26 October 2018
Blue mussels are among the most abundant bivalves in shallow water along the German coasts. As filter feeders, a major ecosystem service they provide is water filtration and the vertical transfer of suspended organic and attached inorganic material to the sea floor. Laboratory and field studies previously demonstrated that blue mussels can remove large quantities of plankton from the surrounding water. I here perform numerical experiments that investigate the effect of filtration at the scale of an entire coastal sea—the southern North Sea. These experiments were performed with a state-of-the-art bentho-pelagic coupled hydrodynamic and ecosystem model and used a novel reconstruction of the benthic biomass distribution of blue mussels. The filtration effect was assessed as the simulated change in net primary productivity caused by blue mussels. In shallow water, filtration takes out up to half of the entire annual primary productivity; it is negligible in offshore waters. For the entire basin, the filtration effect is 10%. While many ecosystem models have a global parameterization for filter feeders, the coastal gradient in the filtration effect is usually not considered; our research demonstrates the importance of including spatially heterogeneous filtration in coupled bentho-pelagic ecosystem models if we want to better understand the spatial patterns in shallow water coastal systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: southern North Sea; Mytilus edulis; benthic filtration; ecosystem productivity southern North Sea; Mytilus edulis; benthic filtration; ecosystem productivity
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    Doi: 10.1594/PANGAEA.892274
    Description: The supporting online material provides for all years, seasons, and months the model results on chlorophyll concentration and net primary productivity (loss). Data used for constructing the figures in this manuscript and the supporting material is available from the related data publication "Simulated net primary productivity (NPP) in the southern North Sea 2003-2013 for a simulation with and without consideration of benthic filtration by Mytilus edulis" on PANGAEA, doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.892274.
MDPI and ACS Style

Lemmen, C. North Sea Ecosystem-Scale Model-Based Quantification of Net Primary Productivity Changes by the Benthic Filter Feeder Mytilus edulis. Water 2018, 10, 1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111527

AMA Style

Lemmen C. North Sea Ecosystem-Scale Model-Based Quantification of Net Primary Productivity Changes by the Benthic Filter Feeder Mytilus edulis. Water. 2018; 10(11):1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111527

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lemmen, Carsten. 2018. "North Sea Ecosystem-Scale Model-Based Quantification of Net Primary Productivity Changes by the Benthic Filter Feeder Mytilus edulis" Water 10, no. 11: 1527. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10111527

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