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Open AccessReview

The Tumor Vessel Targeting Strategy: A Double-Edged Sword in Tumor Metastasis

by 1,2,†, 1,2,†, 1,2, 1,2, 1,2 and 1,2,*
1
College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, No. 601, Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou 510632, China
2
Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Pharmacodynamic Constituents of Traditional Chinese Medicine and New Drugs Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Cells 2019, 8(12), 1602; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8121602
Received: 25 October 2019 / Revised: 3 December 2019 / Accepted: 5 December 2019 / Published: 10 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Angiogenesis in Cancer)
Tumor vessels provide essential paths for tumor cells to escape from the primary tumor and form metastatic foci in distant organs. The vessel targeting strategy has been widely used as an important clinical cancer chemotherapeutic strategy for patients with metastatic tumors. Our review introduces the contribution of angiogenesis to tumor metastasis and summarizes the application of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vessel targeting drugs for metastatic tumors. We recommend the application and mechanisms of vascular targeting drugs for inhibiting tumor metastasis and discuss the risk and corresponding countermeasures after vessel targeting treatment. View Full-Text
Keywords: tumor metastasis; angiogenesis; vessel targeting drugs; pro-metastasis risk tumor metastasis; angiogenesis; vessel targeting drugs; pro-metastasis risk
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lu, W.; Chen, M.; Ye, W.; Zhang, D. The Tumor Vessel Targeting Strategy: A Double-Edged Sword in Tumor Metastasis. Cells 2019, 8, 1602. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8121602

AMA Style

Li X, Li Y, Lu W, Chen M, Ye W, Zhang D. The Tumor Vessel Targeting Strategy: A Double-Edged Sword in Tumor Metastasis. Cells. 2019; 8(12):1602. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8121602

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Xiaobo; Li, Yong; Lu, Weijin; Chen, Minfeng; Ye, Wencai; Zhang, Dongmei. 2019. "The Tumor Vessel Targeting Strategy: A Double-Edged Sword in Tumor Metastasis" Cells 8, no. 12: 1602. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8121602

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