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Clinical and Translational Significance of Basophils in Patients with Cancer

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St. John’s Institute of Dermatology, School of Basic & Medical Biosciences, King’s College London, London SE1 9RT, UK
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School of Cancer & Pharmaceutical Sciences, King’s College London, Guy’s Hospital, London SE1 9RT, UK
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Cancer Centre at Guy’s, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London SE1 9RT, UK
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Breast Cancer Now Research Unit, School of Cancer & Pharmaceutical Sciences, King’s College London, Guy’s Hospital, London SE1 9RT, UK
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alexandre Reuben and Alessandro Poggi
Cells 2022, 11(3), 438; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11030438
Received: 7 December 2021 / Revised: 24 January 2022 / Accepted: 25 January 2022 / Published: 27 January 2022
Despite comprising a very small proportion of circulating blood leukocytes, basophils are potent immune effector cells. The high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcɛRI) is expressed on the basophil cell surface and powerful inflammatory mediators such as histamine, granzyme B, and cytokines are stored in dense cytoplasmic granules, ready to be secreted in response to a range of immune stimuli. Basophils play key roles in eliciting potent effector functions in allergic diseases and type 1 hypersensitivity. Beyond allergies, basophils can be recruited to tissues in chronic and autoimmune inflammation, and in response to parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections. While their activation states and functions can be influenced by Th2-biased inflammatory signals, which are also known features of several tumor types, basophils have received little attention in cancer. Here, we discuss the presence and functional significance of basophils in the circulation of cancer patients and in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Interrogating publicly available datasets, we conduct gene expression analyses to explore basophil signatures and associations with clinical outcomes in several cancers. Furthermore, we assess how basophils can be harnessed to predict hypersensitivity to cancer treatments and to monitor the desensitization of patients to oncology drugs, using assays such as the basophil activation test (BAT). View Full-Text
Keywords: basophil; cancer; allergooncology; basophil activation test (BAT); immunotherapy; IgE; type I hypersensitivity; anaphylaxis; survival; gene expression basophil; cancer; allergooncology; basophil activation test (BAT); immunotherapy; IgE; type I hypersensitivity; anaphylaxis; survival; gene expression
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chauhan, J.; Stavraka, C.; Grandits, M.; Palhares, L.C.G.F.; Josephs, D.H.; Lacy, K.E.; Spicer, J.; Bax, H.J.; Karagiannis, S.N. Clinical and Translational Significance of Basophils in Patients with Cancer. Cells 2022, 11, 438. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11030438

AMA Style

Chauhan J, Stavraka C, Grandits M, Palhares LCGF, Josephs DH, Lacy KE, Spicer J, Bax HJ, Karagiannis SN. Clinical and Translational Significance of Basophils in Patients with Cancer. Cells. 2022; 11(3):438. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11030438

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chauhan, Jitesh, Chara Stavraka, Melanie Grandits, Lais C. G. F. Palhares, Debra H. Josephs, Katie E. Lacy, James Spicer, Heather J. Bax, and Sophia N. Karagiannis. 2022. "Clinical and Translational Significance of Basophils in Patients with Cancer" Cells 11, no. 3: 438. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11030438

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