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Open AccessArticle

Biocompatibility of Poly(ester amide) (PEA) Microfibrils in Ocular Tissues

1
Department of Vitreoretinal Surgery, University Hospitals of Geneva, Rue Alcide-Jentzer 22, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
2
Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany
3
Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Klinische Forschung (IZKF) Aachen, University Hospital Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany
4
DSM, Urmonderbaan 22, Geleen 6167 RD, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2014, 6(1), 243-260; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym6010243
Received: 30 November 2013 / Revised: 10 January 2014 / Accepted: 13 January 2014 / Published: 21 January 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Drug Delivery)
Drug delivery systems (DDS) are able to deliver, over long periods of time, therapeutic concentrations of drugs requiring frequent administration. Two classes of DDS are available, biodegradable and non-biodegradable. The larger non-biodegradable implants ensure long-term delivery, but require surgical interventions. Biodegradable biomaterials are smaller, injectable implants, but degrade hydrolytically and release drugs in non-zero order kinetics, which is inefficient for long-term sustained drug release. Biodegradable poly(ester amides) (PEAs) may overcome these difficulties. To assess their ocular biocompatibility and long-term behavior, PEA fibrils were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, incubation in vitreous humor changes to PEA structure, suggests degradation by surface erosion, enabling drug release with zero order kinetics. Clinical and histological analysis of PEA fibrils implanted subconjunctivally and intravitreally showed the absence of an inflammatory response or other pathological tissue alteration. This study shows that PEA fibrils are biocompatible with ocular environment and degrade by surface erosion. View Full-Text
Keywords: biomaterials; biodegradation; drug delivery; controlled drug release; amino acid biomaterials; biodegradation; drug delivery; controlled drug release; amino acid
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Kropp, M.; Morawa, K.-M.; Mihov, G.; Salz, A.K.; Harmening, N.; Franken, A.; Kemp, A.; Dias, A.A.; Thies, J.; Johnen, S.; Thumann, G. Biocompatibility of Poly(ester amide) (PEA) Microfibrils in Ocular Tissues. Polymers 2014, 6, 243-260.

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