Next Article in Journal
Electrowetting Using a Microfluidic Kelvin Water Dropper
Next Article in Special Issue
Highly Fluorinated Methacrylates for Optical 3D Printing of Microfluidic Devices
Previous Article in Journal
Wearable Pulse Wave Monitoring System Based on MEMS Sensors
Previous Article in Special Issue
Microfluidics: A New Layer of Control for Extrusion-Based 3D Printing
Open AccessFeature PaperReview

3D-Printed Chips: Compatibility of Additive Manufacturing Photopolymeric Substrata with Biological Applications

by 1,† and 1,2,*,†
1
School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
2
Centre for Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Micromachines 2018, 9(2), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9020091
Received: 27 January 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 19 February 2018 / Published: 23 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printed Microfluidic Devices)
Additive manufacturing (AM) is ideal for building adaptable, structurally complex, three-dimensional, monolithic lab-on-chip (LOC) devices from only a computer design file. Consequently, it has potential to advance micro- to milllifluidic LOC design, prototyping, and production and further its application in areas of biomedical and biological research. However, its application in these areas has been hampered due to material biocompatibility concerns. In this review, we summarise commonly used AM techniques: vat polymerisation and material jetting. We discuss factors influencing material biocompatibility as well as methods to mitigate material toxicity and thus promote its application in these research fields. View Full-Text
Keywords: lab-on-a-chip; bioassay; toxicity; additive manufacturing; polymers; 3D printing lab-on-a-chip; bioassay; toxicity; additive manufacturing; polymers; 3D printing
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Carve, M.; Wlodkowic, D. 3D-Printed Chips: Compatibility of Additive Manufacturing Photopolymeric Substrata with Biological Applications. Micromachines 2018, 9, 91.

AMA Style

Carve M, Wlodkowic D. 3D-Printed Chips: Compatibility of Additive Manufacturing Photopolymeric Substrata with Biological Applications. Micromachines. 2018; 9(2):91.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Carve, Megan; Wlodkowic, Donald. 2018. "3D-Printed Chips: Compatibility of Additive Manufacturing Photopolymeric Substrata with Biological Applications" Micromachines 9, no. 2: 91.

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop