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Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of ISS-RapidScat Wind Vectors Using Buoys and ASCAT Data

The First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China
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Remote Sens. 2018, 10(4), 648; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10040648
Received: 8 March 2018 / Revised: 16 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radar Remote Sensing of Oceans and Coastal Areas)
The International Space Station scatterometer (named ISS-RapidScat) was launched by NASA on 20 September 2014 as a continuation of the QuikSCAT climate data record to maintain the availability of Ku-band scatterometer data after the QuikSCAT missions ended. In this study, the overall archived ISS-RapidScat wind vectors in the wind speed range of 0–24 m/s are evaluated by the global moored buoys’ wind observations, including the U.S. National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO), and the Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA), the Research Moored Array for African–Asian–Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction (RAMA), and Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) wind data in the same period of ISS-RapidScat by calculating the statistical parameters, namely, the root mean square error (RMSE), bias (mean of residuals), and correlation coefficient (R) between the collocated data. The comparisons with the global moored buoys show that the RapidScat wind vectors are consistent with buoys’ wind measurements. The average errors of the RapidScat wind vectors are 1.42 m/s and 19.5°. The analysis of the RapidScat wind vector errors at different buoy wind speeds in bins of 1 m/s indicates that the errors of the RapidScat wind speed reduce firstly, and then increase with the increasing buoy wind speed, and the errors of the RapidScat wind direction decrease with increasing buoy wind speed. The comparisons of the errors of the RapidScat wind speed and direction at different months from April 2015 to August 2016 show that the accuracies of the RapidScat wind vectors have no dependence on the time, and the biases of the RapidScat wind speed indicate that there is an annual periodic signal of wind speed errors which are due to the annual cycle variation of ocean winds. The accuracies of the RapidScat wind vectors at different times in one day are also analyzed and the results show that the accuracy of the RapidScat wind vectors at different times of the day is basically consistent and with no diurnal variation. In order to evaluate the ISS-RapidScat wind vectors of the global oceans, the differences (RapidScat-ASCAT) in the wind speed range of 0–30 m/s are analyzed in the different months from October 2014 to August 2016, and the average RMSEs of differences between ISS-RapidScat and ASCAT wind vectors are less than 1.15 m/s and 15.21°. In general, the evaluation of the all-over archived ISS-RapidScat wind vectors show that the accuracies of the ISS-RapidScat wind vectors satisfy the general scatterometer’s mission requirement and are consistent with ASCAT wind data. View Full-Text
Keywords: ISS-RapidScat; scatterometer; wind vector; ASCAT ISS-RapidScat; scatterometer; wind vector; ASCAT
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, J.; Zhang, J. Evaluation of ISS-RapidScat Wind Vectors Using Buoys and ASCAT Data. Remote Sens. 2018, 10, 648.

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