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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

The Accuracies of Himawari-8 and MTSAT-2 Sea-Surface Temperatures in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean

1
Meteorology and Ocean Sciences & Coastal Studies, College of Science and Technology, Millersville University, Millersville, PA 17551, USA
2
Ocean Sciences, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33149, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current affiliation: Center for Remote Sensing, College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA.
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(2), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10020212
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 16 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Sea Surface Temperature Retrievals from Remote Sensing)
Over several decades, improving the accuracy of Sea-Surface Temperatures (SSTs) derived from satellites has been a subject of intense research, and continues to be so. Knowledge of the accuracy of the SSTs is critical for weather and climate predictions, and many research and operational applications. In 2015, the operational Japanese MTSAT-2 geostationary satellite was replaced by the Himawari-8, which has a visible and infrared imager with higher spatial and temporal resolutions than its predecessor. In this study, data from both satellites during a three-month overlap period were compared with subsurface in situ temperature measurements from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) array and self-recording thermometers at the depths of corals of the Great Barrier Reef. Results show that in general the Himawari-8 provides more accurate SST measurements compared to those from MTSAT-2. At various locations, where in situ measurements were taken, the mean Himawari-8 SST error shows an improvement of ~0.15 K. Sources of the differences between the satellite-derived SST and the in situ temperatures were related to wind speed and diurnal heating. View Full-Text
Keywords: sea surface temperatures; geostationary satellite; infrared; tropical western Pacific Ocean; the Great Barrier Reef; accuracy sea surface temperatures; geostationary satellite; infrared; tropical western Pacific Ocean; the Great Barrier Reef; accuracy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ditri, A.L.; Minnett, P.J.; Liu, Y.; Kilpatrick, K.; Kumar, A. The Accuracies of Himawari-8 and MTSAT-2 Sea-Surface Temperatures in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean. Remote Sens. 2018, 10, 212.

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