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Article

Priming Effects of Cover Cropping on Bacterial Community in a Tea Plantation

by 1,2,* and 1
1
Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan
2
Innovation and Development Center of Sustainable Agriculture (IDCSA), National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Georgios Koubouris
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4345; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084345
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 10 April 2021 / Accepted: 12 April 2021 / Published: 14 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Agriculture)
The acidic nature of red soil commonly found in tea plantations provides unique niches for bacterial growth. These bacteria as well as soil properties are dynamic and vary with agricultural management practices. However, less is known about the influence of manipulation such as cover cropping on bacterial communities in tea plantations. In this study a field trial was conducted to address the short-term effects of soybean intercropping on a bacterial community. Diversity, metabolic potential and structure of the bacterial community were determined through community level physiological profiling and amplicon sequencing approaches. Cover cropping was observed to increase soil EC, available P, K, and microelements Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn after three months of cultivation. Bacterial functional diversity and metabolic potential toward six carbon source categories also increased in response to cover cropping. Distinct bacterial communities among treatments were revealed, and the most effective biomarkers, such as Acidobacteriaceae, Burkholderiaceae, Rhodanobacteraceae, and Sphingomonadaceae, were identified in cover cropping. Members belonging to these families are considered as organic matter decomposers and/or plant growth promoting bacteria. We provided the first evidence that cover cropping boosted both copiotrophs (Proteobacteria) and oligotrophs (Acidobacteria), with potentially increased functional stability, facilitated nutrient cycling, and prospective benefits to plants in the tea plantation. View Full-Text
Keywords: priming effects; cover cropping; bacterial community; tea plantation priming effects; cover cropping; bacterial community; tea plantation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shen, F.-T.; Lin, S.-H. Priming Effects of Cover Cropping on Bacterial Community in a Tea Plantation. Sustainability 2021, 13, 4345. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084345

AMA Style

Shen F-T, Lin S-H. Priming Effects of Cover Cropping on Bacterial Community in a Tea Plantation. Sustainability. 2021; 13(8):4345. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084345

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shen, Fo-Ting, and Shih-Han Lin. 2021. "Priming Effects of Cover Cropping on Bacterial Community in a Tea Plantation" Sustainability 13, no. 8: 4345. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084345

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