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Article

Organic Amendments Boost Soil Fertility and Rice Productivity and Reduce Methane Emissions from Paddy Fields under Sub-Tropical Conditions

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Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh
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Entomology Division, Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, Gazipur 1701, Bangladesh
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State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, China National Rice Research Institute, Hangzhou 311440, China
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Department of Plant Pathology and Seed Science, Sylhet Agricultural University, Sylhet 3100, Bangladesh
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Faculty of Agriculture, Government Shahid Akbar Ali Science and Technology College, Thakurgaon 5140, Bangladesh
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Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University, Gazipur 1706, Bangladesh
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Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Poonch Rawalakot, Rawalakot 12350, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan
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Department of Biology, College of Science, Taif University, P.O. Box 11099, Taif 21944, Saudi Arabia
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Rice Research and Training Center (RRTC), Field Crops Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Sakha, Kafr El-Sheikh 33717, Egypt
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International Rice Research Institute, Dhaka 1213, Bangladesh
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Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Kafreilsheikh, Kafr El-Shaikh 33516, Egypt
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Denotes equal contribution.
Academic Editor: Alexandra Jacquelyn Burgess
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3103; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063103
Received: 16 February 2021 / Revised: 2 March 2021 / Accepted: 8 March 2021 / Published: 12 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agricultural Production of Crop Plants)
Deteriorating soil fertility and gradually decreasing rice productivity along with higher greenhouse gas emissions from paddy fields have emerged as serious threats to the sustainability of rice production and food security. Rice production in the subtropical environment in Bangladesh is mostly dependent on synthetic inorganic fertilizer to maintain productivity; however, the inorganic fertilizer has negative effects on global warming. Climate-smart and resilient agricultural production systems are major concerns nowadays to meet sustainable development goals. The study was conducted to evaluate the optimum rate and source of organic amendments on rice productivity and soil fertility along with CH4 emission. A total of nine nutrient combinations were used in the study. The CH4 emission, soil redox potential (Eh), soil pH, soil nitrogen and organic carbon, available phosphorus, rice grain and straw were greatly affected by the application of different rates and sources of the nutrient. However, the soil exchangeable K content, plant height, and harvest index were not affected. Among the treatments, the application of 75% recommended fertilizer (RF) + biosolid 2 t ha−1 (T3) was the most effective and showed the superior performance in terms of available P (12.90 ppm), the number of grains panicle−1 (121), and 1000-grain weight (24.6g), rice grain, and straw yield along with the moderate CH4 emission (18.25 mg m−2h−1). On the other hand, the lowest soil Eh (−158 mV) and soil pH (6.65) were measured from the treatment T3. The finding of this study revealed that the application of 75% of RF + biosolid 2 t ha−1 can be recommended as the preferable soil amendment for boosting rice yield, reduce CH4 emissions, and sustainably maintain soil fertility. Furthermore, this finding may help to introduce preferable soil amendment doses, which will contribute to boosting rice productivity and economic turnouts of the farmers. View Full-Text
Keywords: gaseous emissions; soil fertility; rice; organic amendments gaseous emissions; soil fertility; rice; organic amendments
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MDPI and ACS Style

Haque, M.M.; Datta, J.; Ahmed, T.; Ehsanullah, M.; Karim, M.N.; Akter, M.S.; Iqbal, M.A.; Baazeem, A.; Hadifa, A.; Ahmed, S.; EL Sabagh, A. Organic Amendments Boost Soil Fertility and Rice Productivity and Reduce Methane Emissions from Paddy Fields under Sub-Tropical Conditions. Sustainability 2021, 13, 3103. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063103

AMA Style

Haque MM, Datta J, Ahmed T, Ehsanullah M, Karim MN, Akter MS, Iqbal MA, Baazeem A, Hadifa A, Ahmed S, EL Sabagh A. Organic Amendments Boost Soil Fertility and Rice Productivity and Reduce Methane Emissions from Paddy Fields under Sub-Tropical Conditions. Sustainability. 2021; 13(6):3103. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063103

Chicago/Turabian Style

Haque, Md M., Juel Datta, Tareq Ahmed, Md Ehsanullah, Md N. Karim, Mt. S. Akter, Muhammad A. Iqbal, Alaa Baazeem, Adel Hadifa, Sharif Ahmed, and Ayman EL Sabagh. 2021. "Organic Amendments Boost Soil Fertility and Rice Productivity and Reduce Methane Emissions from Paddy Fields under Sub-Tropical Conditions" Sustainability 13, no. 6: 3103. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063103

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