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Article

Integration of Household Water Filters with Community-Based Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion—A Process Evaluation and Assessment of Use among Households in Rwanda

1
Mortenson Center in Global Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
2
Amazi Yego Ltd., Kigali 20093, Rwanda
3
Catholic Relief Services, Kigali 20093, Rwanda
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Wen Cheng Liu
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 1615; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041615
Received: 24 December 2020 / Revised: 28 January 2021 / Accepted: 1 February 2021 / Published: 3 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Engineering and Sustainable Development)
Unsafe drinking water contributes to diarrheal disease and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in low-income contexts, especially among children under five years of age. Household-level water treatment interventions have previously been deployed in Rwanda to address microbial contamination of drinking water. In this paper, we describe an effort to integrate best practices regarding distribution and promotion of a household water filter with an on-going health behavior messaging program. We describe the implementation of this program and highlight key roles including the evaluators who secured overall funding and conducted a water quality and health impact trial, the promoters who were experts in the technology and behavioral messaging, and the implementers who were responsible for product distribution and education. In January 2019, 1023 LifeStraw Family 2.0 household water filters were distributed in 30 villages in the Rwamagana District of Rwanda. Approximately a year after distribution, 99.5% of filters were present in the household, and water was observed in 95.1% of filters. Compared to another recent water filter program in Rwanda, a lighter-touch engagement with households and supervision of data collection was observed, while also costing approximately twice per household compared to the predecessor program. View Full-Text
Keywords: Rwanda; LifeStraw; household water treatment; water quality; behavior change Rwanda; LifeStraw; household water treatment; water quality; behavior change
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bradshaw, A.; Mugabo, L.; Gebremariam, A.; Thomas, E.; MacDonald, L. Integration of Household Water Filters with Community-Based Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion—A Process Evaluation and Assessment of Use among Households in Rwanda. Sustainability 2021, 13, 1615. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041615

AMA Style

Bradshaw A, Mugabo L, Gebremariam A, Thomas E, MacDonald L. Integration of Household Water Filters with Community-Based Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion—A Process Evaluation and Assessment of Use among Households in Rwanda. Sustainability. 2021; 13(4):1615. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041615

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bradshaw, Abigail, Lambert Mugabo, Alemayehu Gebremariam, Evan Thomas, and Laura MacDonald. 2021. "Integration of Household Water Filters with Community-Based Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion—A Process Evaluation and Assessment of Use among Households in Rwanda" Sustainability 13, no. 4: 1615. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041615

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