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Open AccessArticle

Identifying Shared Strategies and Solutions to the Human–Giant Tortoise Interactions in Santa Cruz, Galapagos: A Nominal Group Technique Application

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Biomedicine Research Institute (INBIOMED), Central University of Ecuador (UCE), 170201 Quito, Ecuador
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Ecuadorian Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG), Galapagos District Directorate, 200350 Puerto Ayora, Ecuador
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Charles Darwin Research Station (CDRS), 200350 Puerto Ayora, Ecuador
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Veterinary Faculty, Complutense University of Madrid, 2804 Madrid, Spain
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Department of Biology, Saint Louis University (SU), St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
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Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, 78315 Radolfzell, Germany
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Whitney Harris World Ecology Center, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63121, USA
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WildCare Institute, Saint Louis Zoo, 1 Government Drive, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(10), 2937; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11102937
Received: 29 March 2019 / Revised: 16 May 2019 / Accepted: 20 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability, Biodiversity, and Conservation)
Conservation conflicts in protected areas are varied and context-specific, but the resulting effects are often similar, leading to important losses for both humans and wildlife. Several methods and approaches have been used to mitigate conservation conflicts, with an increasing emphasis on understanding the human–human dimension of the conflict. In this article, we present a revision of several conservation conflict cases in the management of protected areas, transdisciplinary and participatory approaches to address conservation conflicts, and finalize by illustrating the application of the nominal group technique (NGT) with the case of the human–giant tortoise interactions in Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos. In this article, we demonstrate the use of novel and systematic participatory and deliberative methodology that is able to engage stakeholders in a constructive dialogue to jointly identify and explore options for shared strategies and solutions to conservation conflicts. The results are comparable with other conservation conflicts cases around the world and illustrate the importance of generating legitimatized information that will further help policy and decision-making actions to address conservation conflicts in the management of protected areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: tortoises’ migration; management of protected areas; rural areas; farmlands; land use change; social–ecological approach; conciliatory approach tortoises’ migration; management of protected areas; rural areas; farmlands; land use change; social–ecological approach; conciliatory approach
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Benitez-Capistros, F.; Couenberg, P.; Nieto, A.; Cabrera, F.; Blake, S. Identifying Shared Strategies and Solutions to the Human–Giant Tortoise Interactions in Santa Cruz, Galapagos: A Nominal Group Technique Application. Sustainability 2019, 11, 2937.

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