Next Article in Journal
Contribution of Ecological and Socioeconomic Factors to the Presence and Abundance of Invasive Tree Species in Mississippi, USA
Next Article in Special Issue
Coleopteran Communities Associated with Forests Invaded by Emerald Ash Borer
Previous Article in Journal
Ecological Structure of a Tropical Urban Forest in the Bang Kachao Peninsula, Bangkok
Previous Article in Special Issue
Buying Time: Preliminary Assessment of Biocontrol in the Recovery of Native Forest Vegetation in the Aftermath of the Invasive Emerald Ash Borer
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Forests 2018, 9(1), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9010037

Tree Stress and Mortality from Emerald Ash Borer Does Not Systematically Alter Short-Term Soil Carbon Flux in a Mixed Northeastern U.S. Forest

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Wellesley College, 106 Central St., Wellesley, MA 02481, USA
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, 78 College St., Hanover, NH 03755, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 11 January 2018 / Accepted: 13 January 2018 / Published: 16 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding and Managing Emerald Ash Borer Impacts on Ash Forests)
Full-Text   |   PDF [5664 KB, uploaded 16 January 2018]   |  

Abstract

Invasive insect pests are a common disturbance in temperate forests, but their effects on belowground processes in these ecosystems are poorly understood. This study examined how aboveground disturbance might impact short-term soil carbon flux in a forest impacted by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in central New Hampshire, USA. We anticipated changes to soil moisture and temperature resulting from tree mortality caused by emerald ash borer, with subsequent effects on rates of soil respiration and methane oxidation. We measured carbon dioxide emissions and methane uptake beneath trees before, during, and after infestation by emerald ash borer. In our study, emerald ash borer damage to nearby trees did not alter soil microclimate nor soil carbon fluxes. While surprising, the lack of change in soil microclimate conditions may have been a result of the sandy, well-drained soil in our study area and the diffuse spatial distribution of canopy ash trees and subsequent canopy light gaps after tree mortality. Overall, our results indicate that short-term changes in soil carbon flux following insect disturbances may be minimal, particularly in forests with well-drained soils and a mixed-species canopy. View Full-Text
Keywords: emerald ash borer; forest disturbance; Fraxinus; soil respiration; methane oxidation emerald ash borer; forest disturbance; Fraxinus; soil respiration; methane oxidation
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed
Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Matthes, J.H.; Lang, A.K.; Jevon, F.V.; Russell, S.J. Tree Stress and Mortality from Emerald Ash Borer Does Not Systematically Alter Short-Term Soil Carbon Flux in a Mixed Northeastern U.S. Forest. Forests 2018, 9, 37.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Forests EISSN 1999-4907 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top