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Effects of Lakes on Wildfire Activity in the Boreal Forests of Saskatchewan, Canada
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Influence of Fuel Load Dynamics on Carbon Emission by Wildfires in the Clay Belt Boreal Landscape

1
Chaire Industrielle en Aménagement Forestier Durable (NSERC-UQAT-UQAM), Université du Québec à Montréal; P.O. Box 8888, Stn. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3P8, Canada
2
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre, 1055 du PEPS, P.O. Box 10380, Stn. Sainte-Foy, Québec, QC G1V 4C7, Canada
3
Département des Sciences du Bois et de la Forêt, Université Laval, 2405 de la Terrasse, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
4
Forest Research Institute, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Temiscamingue, 445 blvd de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X 5E4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Timothy A. Martin
Forests 2017, 8(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8010009
Received: 27 September 2016 / Revised: 6 December 2016 / Accepted: 18 December 2016 / Published: 24 December 2016
Old-growth forests play a decisive role in preserving biodiversity and ecological functions. In an environment frequently disturbed by fire, the importance of old-growth forests as both a carbon stock as well as a source of emissions when burnt is not fully understood. Here, we report on carbon accumulation with time since the last fire (TSF) in the dominant forest types of the Clay Belt region in eastern North America. To do so, we performed a fuel inventory (tree biomass, herbs and shrubs, dead woody debris, and duff loads) along four chronosequences. Carbon emissions by fire through successional stages were simulated using the Canadian Fire Effects Model. Our results show that fuel accumulates with TSF, especially in coniferous forests. Potential carbon emissions were on average 11.9 t·ha−1 and 29.5 t·ha−1 for old-growth and young forests, respectively. In conclusion, maintaining old-growth forests in the Clay Belt landscape not only ensures a sustainable management of the boreal forest, but it also optimizes the carbon storage. View Full-Text
Keywords: boreal forest; fuel load dynamics; fire behavior; carbon emission modelling; sustainable management; mitigation management boreal forest; fuel load dynamics; fire behavior; carbon emission modelling; sustainable management; mitigation management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Terrier, A.; Paquette, M.; Gauthier, S.; Girardin, M.P.; Pelletier-Bergeron, S.; Bergeron, Y. Influence of Fuel Load Dynamics on Carbon Emission by Wildfires in the Clay Belt Boreal Landscape. Forests 2017, 8, 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/f8010009

AMA Style

Terrier A, Paquette M, Gauthier S, Girardin MP, Pelletier-Bergeron S, Bergeron Y. Influence of Fuel Load Dynamics on Carbon Emission by Wildfires in the Clay Belt Boreal Landscape. Forests. 2017; 8(1):9. https://doi.org/10.3390/f8010009

Chicago/Turabian Style

Terrier, Aurélie; Paquette, Mathieu; Gauthier, Sylvie; Girardin, Martin P.; Pelletier-Bergeron, Sylvain; Bergeron, Yves. 2017. "Influence of Fuel Load Dynamics on Carbon Emission by Wildfires in the Clay Belt Boreal Landscape" Forests 8, no. 1: 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/f8010009

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