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Genetic Resistance to Fusiform Rust in Southern Pines and White Pine Blister Rust in White Pines—A Contrasting Tale of Two Rust Pathosystems—Current Status and Future Prospects

1
Dorena Genetic Resource Center, USDA Forest Service, 34963 Shoreview Road, Cottage Grove, OR 97424, USA
2
School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, 212 Newins-Ziegler Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
3
Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Victoria, BC V8Z 1M5, Canada
4
Natural Resources Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2014, 5(9), 2050-2083; https://doi.org/10.3390/f5092050
Received: 2 January 2014 / Revised: 21 June 2014 / Accepted: 29 July 2014 / Published: 1 September 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fusiform Rust Disease—Biology and Management of Resistance)
Damage or mortality from pathogens can reduce productivity of forest plantations, as well as significantly harm natural forest ecosystems. Genetic resistance within the host species is the first line of defense for tree species. Resistance breeding programs for the native fusiform rust and exotic (to North America) white pine blister rust diseases are two of the longest concerted efforts in forest trees, spanning more than 50 years. Advances in developing greater genetic resistance have been made in both pathosystems, but unique challenges and opportunities in each system translate to different approaches. Fusiform rust resistance programs have mainly emphasized complete resistance, while partial resistance plays a prominent role in white pine blister rust resistance programs. Advances in the development of molecular genetic tools now permit investigations in conifers and their associated rust pathogens. Good progress has been made in identifying resistant populations and understanding resistance in these pathosystems, and resistant stock is now being used extensively for reforestation and restoration. These programs represent great success stories brought to fruition by the long-term efforts. However, continued support will be needed to enhance the level and fully realize the potential of durable genetic resistance in these invaluable North American conifer species. View Full-Text
Keywords: fusiform rust; blister rust; durable resistance; white pine; loblolly pine fusiform rust; blister rust; durable resistance; white pine; loblolly pine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sniezko, R.A.; Smith, J.; Liu, J.-J.; Hamelin, R.C. Genetic Resistance to Fusiform Rust in Southern Pines and White Pine Blister Rust in White Pines—A Contrasting Tale of Two Rust Pathosystems—Current Status and Future Prospects. Forests 2014, 5, 2050-2083. https://doi.org/10.3390/f5092050

AMA Style

Sniezko RA, Smith J, Liu J-J, Hamelin RC. Genetic Resistance to Fusiform Rust in Southern Pines and White Pine Blister Rust in White Pines—A Contrasting Tale of Two Rust Pathosystems—Current Status and Future Prospects. Forests. 2014; 5(9):2050-2083. https://doi.org/10.3390/f5092050

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sniezko, Richard A.; Smith, Jason; Liu, Jun-Jun; Hamelin, Richard C. 2014. "Genetic Resistance to Fusiform Rust in Southern Pines and White Pine Blister Rust in White Pines—A Contrasting Tale of Two Rust Pathosystems—Current Status and Future Prospects" Forests 5, no. 9: 2050-2083. https://doi.org/10.3390/f5092050

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