Next Article in Journal
Exploring Archetypes of Tropical Fire-Related Forest Disturbances Based on Dense Optical and Radar Satellite Data and Active Fire Alerts
Next Article in Special Issue
Use of Optimization Modeling to Assess the Effect of Timber and Carbon Pricing on Harvest Scheduling, Carbon Sequestration, and Net Present Value of Eucalyptus Plantations
Previous Article in Journal
Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Regulatory Framework for Salt and Drought Tolerance in Hibiscus hamabo Siebold & Zuccarini
Article

Impact of Roadside Drying on Delivered Costs for Eucalyptus globulus Logging Residue and Whole Trees Supplying a Hypothetical Energy Plant in Western Australia Using a Linear-Programming Model

1
ARC Centre for Forest Value, eLogistics Research Group (eLRG), Discipline of ICT, College of Science and Engineering, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia
2
Forest Industries Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore, QLD 4558, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gianni Picchi
Forests 2021, 12(4), 455; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12040455
Received: 24 February 2021 / Revised: 1 April 2021 / Accepted: 1 April 2021 / Published: 9 April 2021
Australia’s large potential forest bioenergy resource is considerably underutilised, due largely to its high delivered costs. Drying forest biomass at the roadside can potentially reduce its delivered cost through weight reduction and increased net calorific value. There has been little research on the impact of roadside drying for Australian conditions and plantation species. This study compared delivered costs for three forest biomass types—Eucalyptus globulus plantation whole trees and logging residue (LR)-disaggregated (LR conventional) or aggregated (LR fuel-adapted)—and three roadside storage scenarios—no storage, ≤two-month storage and optimal storage—to supply a hypothetical thermal power plant in south-west Western Australia. The study was performed using a tactical linear programming tool (MCPlan). Roadside storage reduced delivered costs, with optimal storage (storage for up to 14 months) producing the lowest costs. Delivered costs were inversely related to forest biomass spatial density due to transport cost reductions. Whole trees, which had the highest spatial density, stored under the optimal storage scenario had the lowest delivered costs (AUD 7.89/MWh) while LR conventional, with the lowest spatial density, had the highest delivered costs when delivered without storage (AUD 15.51/MWh). For both LR types, two-month storage achieved ~60% of the savings from the optimal storage scenario but only 23% of the savings for whole trees. The findings suggested that roadside drying and high forest biomass spatial density are critical to reducing forest biomass delivered costs. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioenergy; forest biomass; feedstock types; transport cost; mathematical optimisation; supply chain bioenergy; forest biomass; feedstock types; transport cost; mathematical optimisation; supply chain
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Strandgard, M.; Taskhiri, M.S.; Acuna, M.; Turner, P. Impact of Roadside Drying on Delivered Costs for Eucalyptus globulus Logging Residue and Whole Trees Supplying a Hypothetical Energy Plant in Western Australia Using a Linear-Programming Model. Forests 2021, 12, 455. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12040455

AMA Style

Strandgard M, Taskhiri MS, Acuna M, Turner P. Impact of Roadside Drying on Delivered Costs for Eucalyptus globulus Logging Residue and Whole Trees Supplying a Hypothetical Energy Plant in Western Australia Using a Linear-Programming Model. Forests. 2021; 12(4):455. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12040455

Chicago/Turabian Style

Strandgard, Martin, Mohammad S. Taskhiri, Mauricio Acuna, and Paul Turner. 2021. "Impact of Roadside Drying on Delivered Costs for Eucalyptus globulus Logging Residue and Whole Trees Supplying a Hypothetical Energy Plant in Western Australia Using a Linear-Programming Model" Forests 12, no. 4: 455. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12040455

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop