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Open AccessArticle

Interspecific Variability of Water Storage Capacity and Absorbability of Deadwood

1
Department of Forest Utilization, Engineering and Forest Technology, Faculty of Forestry, University of Agriculture, Al. 29 Listopada 46, 31-425 Krakow, Poland
2
Department of Ecology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, University of Agriculture, Al. 29 Listopada 46, 31-425 Kraków, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(5), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11050575
Received: 10 April 2020 / Revised: 14 May 2020 / Accepted: 18 May 2020 / Published: 21 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecophysiology and Biology)
The aim of the study was to determine the water storage capacity and absorbability of deadwood of different tree species with varying degrees of decomposition. Coniferous (Silver fir—Abies alba Mill.) and deciduous (Common hornbeam—Carpinus betulus L., Common ash—Fraxinus excelsior L., Common alder—Alnus glutinosa Gaertn., and Common aspen—Populus tremula L.) species were selected for the research. The study focuses on the wood of dead trees at an advanced stage of decomposition. Deadwood samples were collected at the Czarna Rózga Nature Reserve in central Poland. Changes over time of the water absorbability and water storage capacity of deadwood were determined under laboratory conditions. The research confirmed the significance of the wood species and the degree of wood decomposition in shaping the water storage capacity and absorbability of deadwood in forest ecosystems. Fir wood was characterized by having the highest water storage capacity and water absorbability. Among deciduous species under analysis, aspen wood was characterized by having the highest water storage capacity and absorbability. Our research has confirmed that deadwood may be a significant reservoir of water in forests. View Full-Text
Keywords: water storage capacity; decomposition rate; coarse woody debris; forest ecosystem water storage capacity; decomposition rate; coarse woody debris; forest ecosystem
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Klamerus-Iwan, A.; Lasota, J.; Błońska, E. Interspecific Variability of Water Storage Capacity and Absorbability of Deadwood. Forests 2020, 11, 575.

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