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Volume 1, June

Forests, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2010) – 5 articles , Pages 1-81

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Article
Phenological and Temperature Controls on the Temporal Non-Structural Carbohydrate Dynamics of Populus grandidentata and Quercus rubra
Forests 2010, 1(1), 65-81; https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010065 - 23 Mar 2010
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 5644
Abstract
Temporal changes in plant tissue non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) may be sensitive to climate changes that alter forest phenology. We examined how temporal fluctuations in tissue NSC concentrations of Populus grandidentata and Quercus rubra relate to net and gross primary production (NPP, GPP) and [...] Read more.
Temporal changes in plant tissue non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) may be sensitive to climate changes that alter forest phenology. We examined how temporal fluctuations in tissue NSC concentrations of Populus grandidentata and Quercus rubra relate to net and gross primary production (NPP, GPP) and their climatic drivers in a deciduous forest of Michigan, USA. Tissue NSC concentrations were coupled with NPP and GPP phenologies, declining from dormancy until GPP initiation and then increasing following NPP cessation. Warmer autumns extended the temporal gap between NPP and GPP cessation, prolonging the period of NSC accumulation. These results suggest that tissue NSC concentrations may increase with climate change. Full article
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Article
Examining the Compatibility between Forestry Incentive Programs in the US and the Practice of Sustainable Forest Management
Forests 2010, 1(1), 49-64; https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010049 - 23 Mar 2010
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 5839
Abstract
This research explores the intersection between the various federal and state forestry incentive programs and the adoption of sustainable forestry practices on non-industrial private forest (NIPF) lands in the US. The qualitative research reported here draws upon a series of eight focus groups [...] Read more.
This research explores the intersection between the various federal and state forestry incentive programs and the adoption of sustainable forestry practices on non-industrial private forest (NIPF) lands in the US. The qualitative research reported here draws upon a series of eight focus groups of NIPF landowners (two each in Minnesota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina). Despite minor regional variations, the dominant theme that emerged is that these landowners’ purchase and management decisions are motivated by the “trilogy” of forest continuity, benefit to the owner, and doing the “right thing.” This trilogy is quite consistent with notions of sustainable forestry, but somewhat more at odds with the objectives of many financial incentive programs, as well as specific tactics such as third-party certification. A series of policy recommendations that emerge from this research is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Article
Yield Implications of Site Preparation Treatments for Lodgepole Pine and White Spruce in Northern British Columbia
Forests 2010, 1(1), 25-48; https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010025 - 15 Mar 2010
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4825
Abstract
We evaluated the effects of site preparation treatments on growth of lodgepole pine and white spruce in north-eastern British Columbia, Canada. These treatments can provide yield gains of up to 10 percent for lodgepole pine and white spruce at 60 and 80 years, [...] Read more.
We evaluated the effects of site preparation treatments on growth of lodgepole pine and white spruce in north-eastern British Columbia, Canada. These treatments can provide yield gains of up to 10 percent for lodgepole pine and white spruce at 60 and 80 years, respectively (estimated using TASS). Stands of these two species are showing a Type 1 response. Using growth multipliers, based on measurements collected at ages 10 to 20 results in inflated estimates of potential yield responses while the age-shift method provides the most appropriate estimates of yield gains when measured during the first 20 years of growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Article
A Methodology for Modelling Canopy Structure: An Exploratory Analysis in the Tall Wet Eucalypt Forests of Southern Tasmania
Forests 2010, 1(1), 4-24; https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010004 - 01 Feb 2010
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 5710
Abstract
A ground-based methodology is presented for spatially modelling forest canopy structure. Field measurements and allometric relationships are used to predict the profiles of free-growing tree crowns on the basis of stem diameter at breast height (dbh). These profiles are incorporated into three-dimensional canopy [...] Read more.
A ground-based methodology is presented for spatially modelling forest canopy structure. Field measurements and allometric relationships are used to predict the profiles of free-growing tree crowns on the basis of stem diameter at breast height (dbh). These profiles are incorporated into three-dimensional canopy models using AutoCAD™ technical drawing software and field data describing the genus, dbh and relative positions of all trees greater than 10 cm dbh; critically, our models account for the effects of competition for light between neighbouring crowns. By horizontally partitioning the models, the presence of distinct strata and the dominant genera associated with each stratum can be identified. Our methodology is applicable to other forest ecosystems as a research tool for investigating changes in vertical structure, and for calibrating remote sensing technologies in order to map and monitor canopy structural variation across forested landscapes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Editorial
Forests: An International and Multi-disciplinary Scientific Open Access Journal
Forests 2010, 1(1), 1-3; https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010001 - 17 Nov 2009
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4711
Abstract
Natural and man-made forests serve many facets of society, including the production and consumption of forest products, provision of various environmental services such as clean air and water, soil protection, sources for critical endangered species habitats, and home for about 80% of the [...] Read more.
Natural and man-made forests serve many facets of society, including the production and consumption of forest products, provision of various environmental services such as clean air and water, soil protection, sources for critical endangered species habitats, and home for about 80% of the world’s terrestrial biodiversity. Throughout the world, forests are essential for offsetting poverty by contributing to the livelihood of the poor, and providing a foundation for the sustainable economic development of many countries. [...] Full article
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