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Article

Examining the Compatibility between Forestry Incentive Programs in the US and the Practice of Sustainable Forest Management

1
Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology, Utah State University, 216C Old Main Hall, Logan, UT 84322-0730, USA
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Department of Forest Resources, University of Minnesota, 301K Green Hall, 1530 Cleveland Ave. N., St. Paul, MN 55108-6112, USA
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School of Forest Resources, The Pennsylvania State University, 309 Forest Resources Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
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Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, P.O. Box 12254, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
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Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Clemson University, Box 340317, Clemson, SC 29634-0317, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2010, 1(1), 49-64; https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010049
Received: 7 December 2009 / Revised: 12 March 2010 / Accepted: 16 March 2010 / Published: 23 March 2010
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
This research explores the intersection between the various federal and state forestry incentive programs and the adoption of sustainable forestry practices on non-industrial private forest (NIPF) lands in the US. The qualitative research reported here draws upon a series of eight focus groups of NIPF landowners (two each in Minnesota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina). Despite minor regional variations, the dominant theme that emerged is that these landowners’ purchase and management decisions are motivated by the “trilogy” of forest continuity, benefit to the owner, and doing the “right thing.” This trilogy is quite consistent with notions of sustainable forestry, but somewhat more at odds with the objectives of many financial incentive programs, as well as specific tactics such as third-party certification. A series of policy recommendations that emerge from this research is presented. View Full-Text
Keywords: land management policies; non-industrial private forests; focus groups; sustainable forestry land management policies; non-industrial private forests; focus groups; sustainable forestry
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MDPI and ACS Style

Daniels, S.E.; Kilgore, M.A.; Jacobson, M.G.; Greene, J.L.; Straka, T.J. Examining the Compatibility between Forestry Incentive Programs in the US and the Practice of Sustainable Forest Management. Forests 2010, 1, 49-64. https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010049

AMA Style

Daniels SE, Kilgore MA, Jacobson MG, Greene JL, Straka TJ. Examining the Compatibility between Forestry Incentive Programs in the US and the Practice of Sustainable Forest Management. Forests. 2010; 1(1):49-64. https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010049

Chicago/Turabian Style

Daniels, Steven E., Michael A. Kilgore, Michael G. Jacobson, John L. Greene, and Thomas J. Straka 2010. "Examining the Compatibility between Forestry Incentive Programs in the US and the Practice of Sustainable Forest Management" Forests 1, no. 1: 49-64. https://doi.org/10.3390/f1010049

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