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Current Oncology is published by MDPI from Volume 28 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Multimed Inc..
Article

Health-Related Quality of Life and Well-Being in Parents of Infants and Toddlers with Cancer

1
Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2S 3C1, Canada
2
Hematology, Oncology, Transplant Program, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada
3
Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Calgary, AB, Canada
4
Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27(2), 206-215; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.4937
Received: 8 February 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 2 April 2020 / Published: 1 May 2020
Background: The unique psychosocial needs of parents and caregivers of young children with cancer are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were to examine health-related quality of life (HRQOL), stress, and psychological distress in parents of young children (0–4 years) diagnosed with cancer; and the associations between parent psychosocial functioning and child treatment characteristics. Methods: Parents (n = 35) with a child (n = 19 male, 54.3%) 0–48 months of age (median: 31.06 months) on active cancer therapy were recruited. Parents completed questionnaires related to demographics, parent HRQOL, parenting stress, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and parent psychological distress. Results: Parents reported clinically elevated parenting stress (5.9%), posttraumatic stress symptoms (18.2%), and psychological distress (21.9%). Compared with population norms, parents reported lower HRQOL in the vitality (t = 5.37, p < 0.001), mental health (t = 4.02, p < 0.001), role limitation–emotional (t = 3.52, p < 0.001), and general health perceptions (t = 2.25, p = 0.025) domains. Social functioning (β = 0.33, p = 0.041) predicted general health perceptions; vitality (β = 0.30, p = 0.134) and parent mental health (β = 0.24, p = 0.285) did not [F(3,29) = 12.64, p < 0.001, R2 = 0.57]. Conclusions: A subset of parents of young children on active cancer treatment experience clinically elevated psychosocial symptoms. Having poor social connections put parents at risk of perceiving their health more poorly in general. Supports that focus on preventing the emergence of clinically significant distress should focus on parents of young children with cancer who are most at risk of poor outcomes.
Keywords: pediatric cancer; infants; parents; stress; health-related quality of life; psychological distress pediatric cancer; infants; parents; stress; health-related quality of life; psychological distress
MDPI and ACS Style

Morhun, J.M.; Racine, N.M.; Guilcher, G.M.T.; Tomfohr-Madsen, L.M.; Schulte, F.S.M. Health-Related Quality of Life and Well-Being in Parents of Infants and Toddlers with Cancer. Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27, 206-215. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.4937

AMA Style

Morhun JM, Racine NM, Guilcher GMT, Tomfohr-Madsen LM, Schulte FSM. Health-Related Quality of Life and Well-Being in Parents of Infants and Toddlers with Cancer. Current Oncology. 2020; 27(2):206-215. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.4937

Chicago/Turabian Style

Morhun, J.M., N.M. Racine, G.M.T. Guilcher, L.M. Tomfohr-Madsen, and F.S.M. Schulte. 2020. "Health-Related Quality of Life and Well-Being in Parents of Infants and Toddlers with Cancer" Current Oncology 27, no. 2: 206-215. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.4937

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