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Open AccessArticle

Are the Physical Environments of Treatment Centres Meeting Recommendations for Patient-Centred Care? Perceptions of Haematological Cancer Patients

1
School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia
3
School of Psychology, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4
Hunter New England Population Health, Wallsend, NSW 2287, Australia
5
Department of Haematology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Derek Clements-CroomeValerie Mace, Youmna Dmour and Ankita Dwivedi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4892; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094892
Received: 17 March 2021 / Revised: 26 April 2021 / Accepted: 30 April 2021 / Published: 4 May 2021
The physical environment of a treatment centre may impact the well-being of patients and their perceptions of care. Outpatients with haematological cancer may be in contact with the treatment centre over long periods and could be particularly affected. This study aimed to identify haematological cancer patients’ perceptions of supportive design elements in the hospital they attended and associations with self-reported mood or well-being. Outpatients from three large metropolitan hospitals in Australia were mailed a self-report questionnaire and responded to statements about the treatment centre concerning their sense of control over the physical surroundings; access to social support; and access to positive distractions. Participants also reported whether they felt the overall environment affected their mood or wellbeing. Of the outpatients who returned the questionnaire (n = 165), almost one-quarter (24%) agreed that the physical environment of the hospital affected their mood or well-being. Patients who disagreed that the hospital was a comfortable temperature or agreed that waiting rooms were crowded had significantly higher odds of reporting that the treatment environment affected their mood or wellbeing. Implementing systems to reduce overcrowding in waiting rooms and increasing patient control over personal temperature in clinics may be the most effective strategies to improve patient wellbeing. View Full-Text
Keywords: treatment centre environment; physical comfort; wellbeing; hospital design; cancer; haematology treatment centre environment; physical comfort; wellbeing; hospital design; cancer; haematology
MDPI and ACS Style

Clinton-McHarg, T.; Paul, C.; Sanson-Fisher, R.; Turon, H.; Butler, M.; Lindeman, R. Are the Physical Environments of Treatment Centres Meeting Recommendations for Patient-Centred Care? Perceptions of Haematological Cancer Patients. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4892. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094892

AMA Style

Clinton-McHarg T, Paul C, Sanson-Fisher R, Turon H, Butler M, Lindeman R. Are the Physical Environments of Treatment Centres Meeting Recommendations for Patient-Centred Care? Perceptions of Haematological Cancer Patients. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4892. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094892

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Paul, Christine; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Turon, Heidi; Butler, Michelle; Lindeman, Robert. 2021. "Are the Physical Environments of Treatment Centres Meeting Recommendations for Patient-Centred Care? Perceptions of Haematological Cancer Patients" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 9: 4892. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094892

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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