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Open AccessArticle

An Educational Intervention for Improving the Snacks and Beverages Brought to Youth Sports in the USA

1
Department of Public Health, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
2
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Frans Folkvord
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4886; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094886
Received: 25 March 2021 / Revised: 24 April 2021 / Accepted: 28 April 2021 / Published: 4 May 2021
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to test a small-scale intervention and its ability to decrease total sugar intake and number of calories offered at youth sports games. Methods: This study was a pre/post-test quasi-experimental design. A flier was developed and distributed to parents. The flier aimed to decrease the sugar-sweetened beverages and increase the nutritional quality of food brought to games. Baseline data were collected in 2018 (n = 61). The flier was distributed prior to the start of the league, once during the league, and posted online in 2019. Postintervention data were collected in the intervention group (n = 122) and a comparison group (n = 74). Nutritional information was collected through direct observation. Results: The average amount of total sugar provided per game per child was 25.5 g at baseline when snacks/beverages were provided at games. After the intervention, the average amount of total sugar provided significantly decreased (16.7 g/game/child, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The intervention reduced total sugar offered and the number of sugar-sweetened beverages brought to games. It was low-cost and could be easily implemented by public health practitioners and/or parks and recreation administrators. Further, considerations could be made to implement policies relative to snacks and beverages at youth sports games. View Full-Text
Keywords: youth; sports; sugar-sweetened beverages; water youth; sports; sugar-sweetened beverages; water
MDPI and ACS Style

Spruance, L.A.; Bennion, N.; Ghanadan, G.; Maddock, J.E. An Educational Intervention for Improving the Snacks and Beverages Brought to Youth Sports in the USA. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4886. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094886

AMA Style

Spruance LA, Bennion N, Ghanadan G, Maddock JE. An Educational Intervention for Improving the Snacks and Beverages Brought to Youth Sports in the USA. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4886. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094886

Chicago/Turabian Style

Spruance, Lori A.; Bennion, Natalie; Ghanadan, Gabriel; Maddock, Jay E. 2021. "An Educational Intervention for Improving the Snacks and Beverages Brought to Youth Sports in the USA" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 9: 4886. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094886

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