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Article

Do Individuals’ Activity Structures Influence Their PM2.5 Exposure Levels? Evidence from Human Trajectory Data in Wuhan City

by 1, 1,2,*, 3,4, 1,2, 1 and 1
1
School of Geography and Information Engineering, China University of Geosciences, 388 Lumo Road, Wuhan 430074, China
2
National Engineering Research Center of Geographic Information System, China University of Geosciences, 388 Lumo Road, Wuhan 430074, China
3
Department of Geography and Resource Management, Institute of Space and Earth Information Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China
4
Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Utrecht University, 3584 CB Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4583; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094583
Received: 20 March 2021 / Revised: 17 April 2021 / Accepted: 21 April 2021 / Published: 26 April 2021
Severe air pollution has become a major risk to human health from a global environmental perspective. It has been recognized that human mobility is an essential component in individual exposure assessment. Activity structure reflects the characteristics of human mobility. Thus, a better understanding of the relationship between human activity structure and individual exposure level is of crucial relevance. This study examines this relationship using a large cell-phone GPS dataset in Wuhan, China. The results indicate that there is a strong linear relationship between people’s activity structures and exposures to PM2.5. Inter-group comparisons based on the four activity structure groups obtained with K-means clustering found that groups with different activity structures do experience different levels of PM2.5 exposure. Furthermore, differences in detailed characteristics of activity structure were also found at different exposure levels at the intra-group level. These results show that people’s activity structures do influence their exposure levels. The paper provides a new perspective for understanding individual exposure through human activity structure, which helps move the perspective of research on individual exposure from the semantic of physical location to the semantic of human activity pattern. View Full-Text
Keywords: PM2.5 exposure; human mobility; cell phone GPS dataset; activity patterns; PM2.5 PM2.5 exposure; human mobility; cell phone GPS dataset; activity patterns; PM2.5
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ma, S.; Yang, L.; Kwan, M.-P.; Zuo, Z.; Qian, H.; Li, M. Do Individuals’ Activity Structures Influence Their PM2.5 Exposure Levels? Evidence from Human Trajectory Data in Wuhan City. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4583. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094583

AMA Style

Ma S, Yang L, Kwan M-P, Zuo Z, Qian H, Li M. Do Individuals’ Activity Structures Influence Their PM2.5 Exposure Levels? Evidence from Human Trajectory Data in Wuhan City. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4583. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094583

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ma, Siyu, Lin Yang, Mei-Po Kwan, Zejun Zuo, Haoyue Qian, and Minghao Li. 2021. "Do Individuals’ Activity Structures Influence Their PM2.5 Exposure Levels? Evidence from Human Trajectory Data in Wuhan City" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 9: 4583. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094583

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