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Article

Evaluation of the Dissemination of the South African 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Birth to 5 Years

1
SA MRC Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand, 2050 Johannesburg, South Africa
2
Health through Physical Activity, Lifestyle and Sport Research Centre & Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, 7700 Cape Town, South Africa
3
MRC Epidemiology Unit & UKCRC Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Xanne Janssen, Ann-Maree Parrish and Maria Esposito
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3071; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063071
Received: 29 January 2021 / Revised: 26 February 2021 / Accepted: 10 March 2021 / Published: 17 March 2021
South Africa (SA) launched their 24-h movement guidelines for birth to five years in December 2018. The guideline dissemination plan adopted a “train-the-trainer” strategy through dissemination workshops with community-based organisations (CBOs) working in early childhood development. The aim of this paper is to: (1) document this dissemination process; and (2) report on the feasibility of implementing the dissemination workshops, the acceptability of the workshops (and guidelines) for different end-user groups, and the extent to which CBO representatives disseminated the guidelines to end-users. Fifteen workshops were held in seven of SA’s nine provinces with a total of 323 attendees. Quantitative and qualitative findings (n = 281) indicate that these workshops were feasible for community-based dissemination of the guidelines and that this method of dissemination was acceptable to CBOs and end-users. Findings from follow-up focus groups (6 groups, n = 28 participants) indicate that the guidelines were shared with end-users of CBOs who participated in the focus groups. An additional musical storytelling resource, the “Woza, Mntwana” song, was well-received by participants; sharing via WhatsApp was believed to be the most effective way to disseminate this song. These findings confirm the feasibility and acceptability of culturally appropriate and context-specific community-based dissemination of behavioural guidelines in low-income settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: movement behaviour guidelines; implementation; low- and middle-income country movement behaviour guidelines; implementation; low- and middle-income country
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MDPI and ACS Style

Draper, C.E.; Silubonde, T.M.; Mukoma, G.; van Sluijs, E.M.F. Evaluation of the Dissemination of the South African 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Birth to 5 Years. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3071. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063071

AMA Style

Draper CE, Silubonde TM, Mukoma G, van Sluijs EMF. Evaluation of the Dissemination of the South African 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Birth to 5 Years. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(6):3071. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063071

Chicago/Turabian Style

Draper, Catherine E., Takana M. Silubonde, Gudani Mukoma, and Esther M. F. van Sluijs. 2021. "Evaluation of the Dissemination of the South African 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Birth to 5 Years" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 6: 3071. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063071

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