Next Article in Journal
Mortality-Risk Prediction Model from Road-Traffic Injury in Drunk Drivers: Machine Learning Approach
Next Article in Special Issue
The Role of Health Literacy among Outpatient Caregivers during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Previous Article in Journal
Insecticidal Efficacy of Microbial-Mediated Synthesized Copper Nano-Pesticide against Insect Pests and Non-Target Organisms
Previous Article in Special Issue
Bioinformatics Approach to Mitigate Mislabeling in EU Seafood Market and Protect Consumer Health
Article

What Factors Predict the Use of Coercive Food Parenting Practices among Mothers of Young Children? An Examination of Food Literacy, Disordered Eating and Parent Demographics

1
Department of Social Marketing, Griffith University, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport, QLD 4215, Australia
2
Department of Public Health, Griffith University, 1 Parklands Drive, Southport, QLD 4215, Australia
3
Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 207 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Guglielmo Bonaccorsi, Chiara Lorini and Virginia Vettori
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10538; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910538
Received: 27 August 2021 / Revised: 29 September 2021 / Accepted: 7 October 2021 / Published: 8 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Literacy, Nutrition and Public Health)
Parents have the most significant influence on the development of young children’s eating patterns. Understanding what parental factors best predict specific negative feeding practices is important for designing preventive interventions. We examined the relationship between parents’ use of coercive food parenting practices (pressure to eat and restriction) and parents’ disordered eating, food literacy, Body Mass Index (BMI) and socio-economic status (SES). Adult mothers, with a mean age of 33 years, at least one child aged between 6 months and 5 years and living in Australia (n = 819) completed an online questionnaire. Regression models were used to examine predictors of pressure to eat and restriction, respectively. Although the amount of variance accounted for by the models was small, maternal eating disorder symptoms were found to be the most important predictor of coercive food parenting practices. This finding has implications for early nutrition education, which has traditionally focused heavily on nutrition literacy. Parental disordered eating may be a more important preventive target and thus including behavioral strategies for positive feeding practices may better assist mothers in promoting positive eating habits with their children, rather than traditional approaches that aim to increase nutrition literacy. View Full-Text
Keywords: food parenting practices; food literacy; disordered eating; mothers food parenting practices; food literacy; disordered eating; mothers
MDPI and ACS Style

Norton, L.; Parkinson, J.; Harris, N.; Hart, L.M. What Factors Predict the Use of Coercive Food Parenting Practices among Mothers of Young Children? An Examination of Food Literacy, Disordered Eating and Parent Demographics. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10538. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910538

AMA Style

Norton L, Parkinson J, Harris N, Hart LM. What Factors Predict the Use of Coercive Food Parenting Practices among Mothers of Young Children? An Examination of Food Literacy, Disordered Eating and Parent Demographics. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(19):10538. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910538

Chicago/Turabian Style

Norton, Lyza, Joy Parkinson, Neil Harris, and Laura M. Hart. 2021. "What Factors Predict the Use of Coercive Food Parenting Practices among Mothers of Young Children? An Examination of Food Literacy, Disordered Eating and Parent Demographics" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 19: 10538. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910538

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop