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Agonist Treatment for Opioid Dependence Syndrome: The Impact of Current Understanding upon Recommendations for Policy Initiatives

1
Addiction Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV), 1004 Lausanne, Switzerland
2
Faculty of Law, University of Geneva, 1211 Genève, Switzerland
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Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Lausanne, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
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Independant Counsultant, 3012 Bern, Switzerland
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Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Global Health, Chemin de Mines 9, 1202 Geneva, Switzerland
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Dr. Robert Ltd. on behalf of the Swiss Society of Addiction Medicine, 3000 Bern, Switzerland
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Willem Scholten Consultancy, NL-3411 AD Lopik, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Icro Maremmani and Maurice Dematteis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10155; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910155
Received: 27 July 2021 / Revised: 7 September 2021 / Accepted: 19 September 2021 / Published: 27 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Opioids: A Challenge to Public Health)
The provision of opioid agonist treatments (OATs), as a standard approach towards opioid dependence syndrome, differs widely between countries. In response to access disparities, in 2014, the Council of Europe’s Pompidou Group first brought together an expert group on framework conditions for the treatment of opioid dependence. The group used a Delphi approach to structure their discussions and develop guiding principles for the modernisation of OAT regulations and legislation. The expert group identified some 60 guiding principles, which were then the subject of wide public consultation. Endorsed by Pompidou Group member states, the final report identified four key recommendations: (1) Prescription and delivery without prior authorisation schemes; (2) Effective removal of financial barriers to access to care; (3) Coordination and follow-up by a national consultative body; and (4) Neutral, precise and respectful terminology. During meetings, the expert group hypothesised that inequalities in OAT access are likely to be linked to underlying rationales which in theory are contradictory, but in practice co-exist within the different political frameworks. The present article considers the perceived influence upon different regulatory frameworks. Discussion is centred around the potential impact of underlying rationales upon the effective implementation of a modernised framework. View Full-Text
Keywords: opioid dependence syndrome; opioid agonist treatment; OAT; harm reduction; legislation; policy opioid dependence syndrome; opioid agonist treatment; OAT; harm reduction; legislation; policy
MDPI and ACS Style

Dickson, C.; Junod, V.; Stamm, R.; Jeannot, E.; Hämmig, R.; Scholten, W.; Simon, O. Agonist Treatment for Opioid Dependence Syndrome: The Impact of Current Understanding upon Recommendations for Policy Initiatives. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10155. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910155

AMA Style

Dickson C, Junod V, Stamm R, Jeannot E, Hämmig R, Scholten W, Simon O. Agonist Treatment for Opioid Dependence Syndrome: The Impact of Current Understanding upon Recommendations for Policy Initiatives. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(19):10155. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910155

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dickson, Cheryl, Valérie Junod, René Stamm, Emilien Jeannot, Robert Hämmig, Willem Scholten, and Olivier Simon. 2021. "Agonist Treatment for Opioid Dependence Syndrome: The Impact of Current Understanding upon Recommendations for Policy Initiatives" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 19: 10155. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910155

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