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Concept Paper

Risk Factors and Behaviours of Schoolchildren with Myopia in Taiwan

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei Tzu-chi Hospital, New Taipei City 231, Taiwan
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Tzu-chi University, Huanlien County 907, Taiwan
3
Dept. of Healthcare Information and Management, Ming Chuan University, Taoyuan City 333, Taiwan
4
Department of Ophthalmology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Medical College, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
5
Department of Business Administration, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 1967; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061967
Received: 13 January 2020 / Revised: 3 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 March 2020 / Published: 17 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Children Development and Health Care in Stress and Wellbeing Contexts)
Importance: Because of the high prevalence of myopia in Taiwan, understanding the risk factors for its development and progression is important to public health. Background: This study investigated the risk factors for myopia and their influence on the progression of myopia in schoolchildren in Taiwan. Design: Patients’ clinical records were obtained retrospectively from ophthalmologists. Questionnaires were given to collect demographic information, family background, hours spent on daily activities, myopia progression, and treatment methods. Participants: From a regional medical hospital in northern Taiwan, 522 schoolchildren with myopia participated in the study. Written informed consent was obtained from participants of legal age or the parents or legal guardians of younger children. Methods: Multivariable regression analyses were performed. Myopia measured in cycloplegic spherical equivalent (SE) was analysed, controlling for patients’ family and demographic information as well as their daily activity behaviours. Main Outcome Results: Children with high myopic parents were more myopic. Earlier onset age of myopia was associated with a higher level of myopia and greater annual myopic progression. Children reporting longer time usage of electronic devices had greater progression of myopia. Boys tended to be more myopic than girls. Lower levels of myopia were associated with more outdoor activities, and better vision care knowledge in children and parents. Conclusions and Relevance: In addition to genetics, education and environment can influence the development of myopia. Health policies for schoolchildren should promote protective activities and vision care knowledge at a young age, to protect the eyesight of schoolchildren. View Full-Text
Keywords: myopia progression; environmental factors; vision care knowledge myopia progression; environmental factors; vision care knowledge
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cheng, H.-C.; Chang, K.; Shen, E.; Luo, K.-S.; Ying, Y.-H. Risk Factors and Behaviours of Schoolchildren with Myopia in Taiwan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1967. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061967

AMA Style

Cheng H-C, Chang K, Shen E, Luo K-S, Ying Y-H. Risk Factors and Behaviours of Schoolchildren with Myopia in Taiwan. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(6):1967. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061967

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cheng, Han-Chih, Koyin Chang, Elizabeth Shen, Kai-Shin Luo, and Yung-Hsiang Ying. 2020. "Risk Factors and Behaviours of Schoolchildren with Myopia in Taiwan" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 6: 1967. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061967

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