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Open AccessArticle

Personal Cold Protection Behaviour and Its Associated Factors in 2016/17 Cold Days in Hong Kong: A Two-Year Cohort Telephone Survey Study

1
National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Emmanuel Kaye Building, London SW3 6LR, UK
2
Collaborating Centre for Oxford University and CUHK for Disaster and Medical Humanitarian Response (CCOUC), Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR, China
3
Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, Chinese University of Hong Kong, New Territories, Hong Kong, China
4
Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1672; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051672
Received: 7 January 2020 / Revised: 28 February 2020 / Accepted: 29 February 2020 / Published: 4 March 2020
Background: Despite larger health burdens attributed to cold than heat, few studies have examined personal cold protection behaviours (PCPB). This study examined PCPB during cold waves and identified the associated factors in a subtropical city for those without central heating system. Methods: A cohort telephone survey was conducted in Hong Kong during a colder cold wave (2016) and a warmer cold wave (2017) among adults (≥15). Socio-demographic information, risk perception, self-reported adverse health effects and patterns of PCPB during cold waves were collected. Associated factors of PCPB in 2017 were identified using multiple logistic regression. Results: The cohort included 429 subjects. PCPB uptake rates were higher during the colder cold wave (p < 0.0005) except for ensuring indoor ventilation. Of the vulnerable groups, 63.7% had low self-perceived health risks. High risk perception, experience of adverse health effects during the 2016 cold wave, females and older groups were positive associated factors of PCPB in 2017 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: PCPB changed with self-risk perception. However vulnerable groups commonly underestimated their own risk. Indoor ventilation may be a concern during cold days in settings that are less prepared for cold weather. Targeted awareness-raising promotion for vulnerable groups and practical strategies for ensuring indoor ventilation are needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: cold; personal health protective behaviour; associated factors; risk perception; subtropical city cold; personal health protective behaviour; associated factors; risk perception; subtropical city
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lam, H.C.Y.; Huang, Z.; Liu, S.; Guo, C.; Goggins, W.B.; Chan, E.Y.Y. Personal Cold Protection Behaviour and Its Associated Factors in 2016/17 Cold Days in Hong Kong: A Two-Year Cohort Telephone Survey Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1672.

AMA Style

Lam HCY, Huang Z, Liu S, Guo C, Goggins WB, Chan EYY. Personal Cold Protection Behaviour and Its Associated Factors in 2016/17 Cold Days in Hong Kong: A Two-Year Cohort Telephone Survey Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(5):1672.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lam, Holly C.Y.; Huang, Zhe; Liu, Sida; Guo, Chunlan; Goggins, William B.; Chan, Emily Y.Y. 2020. "Personal Cold Protection Behaviour and Its Associated Factors in 2016/17 Cold Days in Hong Kong: A Two-Year Cohort Telephone Survey Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 5: 1672.

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