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Associations among Adolescents’ Relationships with Parents, Peers, and Teachers, Self-Efficacy, and Willingness to Intervene in Bullying: A Social Cognitive Approach
Open AccessArticle

Relations among Poly-Bullying Victimization, Subjective Well-Being and Resilience in a Sample of Late Adolescents

1
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education and Humanities, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda de los Alfares, 42, 16071 Cuenca, Spain
2
Department of Pedagogy, Faculty of Education and Humanities, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda de los Alfares, 42, 16071 Cuenca, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 590; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020590
Received: 30 December 2019 / Revised: 13 January 2020 / Accepted: 14 January 2020 / Published: 16 January 2020
The present study examined the relations among poly-bullying victimization (experiencing multiple forms of peer bullying), resilience and subjective well-being. This study specifically examined late adolescents’ resilience as a moderator of the relation between poly-bullying victimization and subjective well-being. In a region of central Spain, 1430 undergraduate students (64% females, 36% males), aged between 18 and 22 years, completed three self-reported measures, including bullying victimization experiences, self-reported subjective well-being and resilience. A substantial proportion of the participants (16.9%) reported being victims of poly-bullying. The results showed that the poly-bullying victimization group reported the poorest subjective well-being and the lowest resilience levels. The regression analyses revealed that resilience was significantly and positively associated with subjective well-being, and resilience moderated the association between poly-bullying victimization and subjective well-being. However, the relation was very weak and accounted for only an additional 1% of variance in the participants’ subjective well-being. Future research should assess resilience trajectories of youth exposed to multiple forms of bullying victimization in order to better understand the potential protective effect of resilience over negative mental health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: bullying; subjective well-being; resilience; poly-victimization; late adolescents bullying; subjective well-being; resilience; poly-victimization; late adolescents
MDPI and ACS Style

Víllora, B.; Larrañaga, E.; Yubero, S.; Alfaro, A.; Navarro, R. Relations among Poly-Bullying Victimization, Subjective Well-Being and Resilience in a Sample of Late Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 590.

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