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Open AccessArticle

Citizen Science-Informed Community Master Planning: Land Use and Built Environment Changes to Increase Flood Resilience and Decrease Contaminant Exposure

1
Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
2
School of Public Health, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
3
Epidemiology Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 486; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020486
Received: 9 December 2019 / Revised: 6 January 2020 / Accepted: 10 January 2020 / Published: 12 January 2020
Communities adjacent to concentrated areas of industrial land use (CAILU) are exposed to elevated levels of pollutants during flood disasters. Many CAILU are also characterized by insufficient infrastructure, poor environmental quality, and socially vulnerable populations. Manchester, TX is a marginalized CAILU neighborhood proximate to several petrochemical industrial sites that is prone to frequent flooding. Pollutants from stormwater runoff discharge from industrial land uses into residential areas have created increased toxicant exposures. Working with local organizations, centers/institutes, stakeholders, and residents, public health researchers sampled air, water, indoor dust, and outdoor soil while researchers from landscape architecture and urban planning applied these findings to develop a community-scaled master plan. The plan utilizes land use and built environment changes to increase flood resiliency and decrease exposure to contaminants. Using a combination of models to assess the performance, costs, and benefits of green infrastructure and pollutant load impacts, the master plan is projected to capture 147,456 cubic feet of runoff, and create $331,400 of annual green benefits by reducing air pollution and energy use, providing pollution treatment, increase carbon dioxide sequestration, and improve groundwater replenishment. Simultaneously, there is a 41% decrease across all analyzed pollutants, reducing exposure to and transferal of toxic materials. View Full-Text
Keywords: public health; green infrastructure; landscape performance; resilience; contamination public health; green infrastructure; landscape performance; resilience; contamination
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Newman, G.; Shi, T.; Yao, Z.; Li, D.; Sansom, G.; Kirsch, K.; Casillas, G.; Horney, J. Citizen Science-Informed Community Master Planning: Land Use and Built Environment Changes to Increase Flood Resilience and Decrease Contaminant Exposure. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 486.

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