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Post-9/11 Mental Health Comorbidity Predicts Self-Reported Confusion or Memory Loss in World Trade Center Health Registry Enrollees

1
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Long Island City, NY 11101, USA
2
School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7330; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197330
Received: 15 September 2020 / Revised: 30 September 2020 / Accepted: 5 October 2020 / Published: 8 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 9/11 Health Update)
Numerous studies report elevated levels of chronic mental health conditions in those exposed to the World Trade Center attacks of 11 September 2001 (9/11), but few studies have examined the incidence of confusion or memory loss (CML) or its association with mental health in 9/11 attack survivors. We investigated the incidence of CML and its association with the number of post-9/11 mental health conditions (PTSD, depression, and anxiety) in 10,766 World Trade Center Health Registry (Registry) enrollees aged 35–64 at the time of the wave 4 survey (2015–2016) that completed all four-wave surveys and met the study inclusion criteria. We employed log-binomial regression to evaluate the associations between CML and the number of mental health conditions. A total of 20.2% of enrollees in the sample reported CML, and there was a dose-response relationship between CML and the number of mental health conditions (one condition: RR = 1.85, 95% CI (1.65, 2.09); two conditions: RR = 2.13, 95% CI (1.85, 2.45); three conditions: RR = 2.51, 95% CI (2.17, 2.91)). Survivors may be experiencing confusion or memory loss partly due to the mental health consequences of the 9/11 attacks. Clinicians treating patients with mental health conditions should be aware of potential cognitive impairment. View Full-Text
Keywords: World Trade Center; 9/11; disaster; mental health; confusion; memory loss World Trade Center; 9/11; disaster; mental health; confusion; memory loss
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alper, H.E.; Tuly, R.A.; Seil, K.; Brite, J. Post-9/11 Mental Health Comorbidity Predicts Self-Reported Confusion or Memory Loss in World Trade Center Health Registry Enrollees. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7330. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197330

AMA Style

Alper HE, Tuly RA, Seil K, Brite J. Post-9/11 Mental Health Comorbidity Predicts Self-Reported Confusion or Memory Loss in World Trade Center Health Registry Enrollees. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(19):7330. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197330

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alper, Howard E., Rifat A. Tuly, Kacie Seil, and Jennifer Brite. 2020. "Post-9/11 Mental Health Comorbidity Predicts Self-Reported Confusion or Memory Loss in World Trade Center Health Registry Enrollees" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 19: 7330. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197330

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