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Eat to Live, Don’t Live to Eat: Black Men, Masculinity, Faith and Food

Department of Sociology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4264; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124264
Received: 20 April 2020 / Revised: 19 May 2020 / Accepted: 6 June 2020 / Published: 15 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress, Faith, Resiliency, and Health among Black Men)
Men often have poorer health outcomes than women. In the United States, Black men in particular tend to have worse health than not only Black women but other racial/ethnic groups of men. One factor that contributes to health is the role of masculinity. Previous research notes that men who cling to hegemonic notions of masculine identity tend to engage in negative health behaviors. However, hegemonic masculinity is not the realm in which Black men exist. Criminalized, surveilled, and subject to structural racism and racial discrimination, Black masculinities exist on their own spectrum separate from that of White men. One characteristic associated with Black masculinity is that of faith, and faith is a growing field of study with respect to health. This paper examines the relationship between Black masculinity as framed by faith in shaping the food and eating habits of Black men. Food and eating are central to health and well-being yet remain understudied with respect to Black masculinity through the lens of faith. This study offers a qualitative account of Black men’s experiences through the use of in-depth interview data. The key finding of this study is that fasting operates as a mechanism of health promotion for Black men. This paper utilizes the term Black men as an all-encompassing term of members of the African diaspora as opposed to African American in order to recognize the diversity of the participants in this study. View Full-Text
Keywords: Black men; masculinity; faith; food; health Black men; masculinity; faith; food; health
MDPI and ACS Style

Brown, L.E.C. Eat to Live, Don’t Live to Eat: Black Men, Masculinity, Faith and Food. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4264. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124264

AMA Style

Brown LEC. Eat to Live, Don’t Live to Eat: Black Men, Masculinity, Faith and Food. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(12):4264. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124264

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brown, Letisha E.C. 2020. "Eat to Live, Don’t Live to Eat: Black Men, Masculinity, Faith and Food" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 12: 4264. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124264

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