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Open AccessArticle

Tailored Mental Health Literacy Training Improves Mental Health Knowledge and Confidence among Canadian Farmers

1
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
2
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 3-300 Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, AB T7G 1C9, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3807; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113807
Received: 30 April 2020 / Revised: 23 May 2020 / Accepted: 23 May 2020 / Published: 27 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health in Agriculture)
This study evaluated the impact of “In the Know” mental health literacy training for Canadian agriculture. We hypothesized that “In the Know” would significantly increase participants’ knowledge around mental health, confidence in recognizing mental health struggles, confidence in speaking about mental health with others, and confidence in helping someone who may be struggling with mental health. “In the Know” was a 4-h, in-person program delivered by a mental health professional who also had experience in agriculture. Six sessions were offered in Ontario, Canada in 2018. Participants were farmers and/or worked primarily with farmers. A pre-training paper questionnaire was administered, followed by a post-training questionnaire at the end of the session and 3 and 6 month post-training questionnaires via email. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed to compare participants’ self-reported knowledge and confidence across four timepoints. “In the Know” significantly improved participants’ self-reported mental health knowledge and confidence in recognizing mental health struggles, speaking to others, and helping others who are struggling immediately following training and often at 3 and 6 months post-training. This is the first study among farming populations to measure program impact with 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Given the reported associations between mental health literacy and increased help-seeking, disseminating “In the Know” more broadly across farming communities may help to increase mental health literacy and thus increase help-seeking among farmers. View Full-Text
Keywords: mental health literacy; agriculture; evaluation; mental health; farmers mental health literacy; agriculture; evaluation; mental health; farmers
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Hagen, B.N.M.; Harper, S.L.; O’Sullivan, T.L.; Jones-Bitton, A. Tailored Mental Health Literacy Training Improves Mental Health Knowledge and Confidence among Canadian Farmers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3807.

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