Next Article in Journal
Multimorbidity among Two Million Adults in China
Next Article in Special Issue
Inadequate Knowledge, Attitude and Practices about Second-Hand Smoke among Non-Smoking Pregnant Women in Urban Vietnam: The Need for Health Literacy Reinforcement
Previous Article in Journal
Trend in the Prevalence of Non-Daily Smoking and Their Relationship with Mental Health Using the Korea Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Previous Article in Special Issue
Exposure to Tobacco, Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Nicotine in Pregnancy: A Pragmatic Overview of Reviews of Maternal and Child Outcomes, Effectiveness of Interventions and Barriers and Facilitators to Quitting
Open AccessArticle

Parental Perceptions of Children’s Exposure to Tobacco Smoke and Parental Smoking Behaviour

1
Department of Health Promotion, School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
2
Department of Statistics, Hebrew University, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 9190501, Israel
3
School of Psychological Sciences, Gershon H. Gordon Faculty of Social Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3397; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103397
Received: 27 March 2020 / Revised: 27 April 2020 / Accepted: 11 May 2020 / Published: 13 May 2020
Around 40% of children are exposed to tobacco smoke, increasing their risk of poor health. Previous research has demonstrated misunderstanding among smoking parents regarding children’s exposure. The parental perceptions of exposure (PPE) measure uses visual and textual vignettes to assess awareness of exposure to smoke. The study aimed to determine whether PPE is related to biochemical and reported measures of exposure in children with smoking parents. Families with at least one smoking parent and a child ≤ age 8 were recruited. In total, 82 parents completed the PPE questionnaire, which was assessed on a scale of 1–7 with higher scores denoting a broader perception of exposure. Parents provided a sample of their child’s hair and a self-report of parental smoking habits. Parents who reported smoking away from home had higher PPE ratings than parents who smoke in and around the home (p = 0.026), constituting a medium effect size. PPE corresponded with home smoking frequency, with rare or no home exposure associated with higher PPE scores compared to daily or weekly exposure (p < 0.001). PPE was not significantly related to hair nicotine but was a significant explanatory factor for home smoking location. PPE was significantly associated with parental smoking behaviour, including location and frequency. High PPE was associated with lower exposure according to parental report. This implies that parental understanding of exposure affects protective behaviour and constitutes a potential target for intervention to help protect children. View Full-Text
Keywords: tobacco smoke exposure; children; smoking behaviour; perceptions; parents tobacco smoke exposure; children; smoking behaviour; perceptions; parents
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Myers, V.; Rosen, L.J.; Zucker, D.M.; Shiloh, S. Parental Perceptions of Children’s Exposure to Tobacco Smoke and Parental Smoking Behaviour. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3397.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop