Next Article in Journal
Planning of a Health Emergency Disaster Risk Management Programme for a Chinese Ethnic Minority Community
Next Article in Special Issue
Association of Consecutive Influenza Vaccinations and Pneumonia: A Population-Based Case-Control Study
Previous Article in Journal
Immigrant–Native Differences in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage and Snack Consumption and Preventive Behaviors Associated with Severe Early Childhood Caries: A Large-Scale Survey in Taiwan
Previous Article in Special Issue
Pathologic Use of Video Games and Motivation: Can the Gaming Motivation Scale (GAMS) Predict Depression and Trait Anxiety?
Article

Measuring the Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences by Survey Research Methods

1
Institute of Behavioral Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, University of Debrecen, Móricz Zsigmond krt. 22., H-4032 Debrecen, Hajdú-Bihar, Hungary
2
Median Opinion & Market Research Ltd., Fürj utca 2., H-1124 Budapest, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 1048; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061048
Received: 30 December 2018 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 20 March 2019 / Published: 22 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IJERPH: 15th Anniversary)
Background: Child maltreatment has been firmly established as a fundamental risk factor for adult health. However, its quantification poses many questions methodologically, psychologically, and culturally alike. We carried out the first nationally representative survey research in Hungary and in Central–Eastern Europe to assess the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among adults. Methods: Data were collected by an opinion research company using a screening tool of the Adverse Childhood Experiences study. Results: 25% (n = 293) of adults reported any childhood adversity; 5% (n = 59) of them had four or more ACEs. The most prevalent forms of child maltreatment were emotional (5%, n = 59) and physical abuse (5%, n = 59), sexual abuse (1%, n = 12) being the least prevalent. The most frequent dysfunctional household condition was parental divorce or separation (13%, n = 153), followed by household substance abuse (11%, n = 129). Conclusions: Nationally representative surveys on ACEs found a range of overall prevalence of various forms of child maltreatment between 14.1 and 35.2% into which our results fall. Nevertheless, our survey most likely underestimates the prevalence of child maltreatment in Hungary, reflecting the impact of a host of factors influencing awareness. Survey research methods are appropriate to obtain nationally representative data on child maltreatment that not only contribute to designing interventions but can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of interventions to improve child and adult health in the long run. View Full-Text
Keywords: adverse childhood experiences (ACEs); Hungarian representative adult sample; opinion poll; ACE Score Calculator adverse childhood experiences (ACEs); Hungarian representative adult sample; opinion poll; ACE Score Calculator
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ujhelyi Nagy, A.; Kuritár Szabó, I.; Hann, E.; Kósa, K. Measuring the Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences by Survey Research Methods. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1048. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061048

AMA Style

Ujhelyi Nagy A, Kuritár Szabó I, Hann E, Kósa K. Measuring the Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences by Survey Research Methods. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(6):1048. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061048

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ujhelyi Nagy, Anikó, Ildikó Kuritár Szabó, Endre Hann, and Karolina Kósa. 2019. "Measuring the Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences by Survey Research Methods" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 6: 1048. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061048

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop